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Conclusion: Every business now operates in a context that includes the use of digital services. While the IT strategies of many organisations articulate a business case for technological innovation, they offer little guidance in terms of organisational patterns that enable and facilitate the delivery of useful and reliable digital services. Organisational structures must be adapted to meet the needs of the new world of digital service networks.

Conclusion: Withouthonest and informed feedback from clients on the effectiveness of the services delivered, IT management must rely on their intuition to devise ways to enhance services and measure the department’s performance.

The ideal way to obtain the insights needed to enhance IT services and measure performance is to conduct an IT Service Effectiveness, or Customer Satisfaction Survey, on a regular basis and act on the findings. Actions might include, for instance, justifying an increase in the IT Expense budget or acquiring extra computing resources to improve online systems performance.

Conclusion: A new category of service provider is emerging in the cloud ecosystem: ‘Cloud Integration Services’. Cloud Integration Services will have significant implications for IT planning, investments, and the extent to which IT can maintain control over architecture and standards. Understanding the role of Cloud Integration Services, their strengths, their limitations, and the likely impact on traditional IT groups is essential for any organisation that is engaged with, or considering being engaged with cloud services – which is everyone.

Conclusion: Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) is starting to be used in dev/test and production environments by many ANZ organisations. CIOs who get IaaS right will create significant benefits for their organisation, both in cost and agility, and greatly improve the perception of IT with their peers in the organisation.

However, a general lack of experience with Cloud, and the use of outdated infrastructure purchasing approaches, may result in poor IaaS contracts that can cost the organisation hundreds of thousands, if not millions of dollars per year in excess fees. To combat this, CIOs should adopt a just-in-time approach to IaaS, eliminating vendors that lack the contract terms, or depth of infrastructure resources, to accommodate this approach.

Conclusion: Cloud infrastructure and platforms have started to alter the landscape of data storage and data processing. Software as a Service (SaaS) Customer Relationship Management (CRM) functionality such as Salesforce.com is considered best of breed, and even traditional vendors such as SAP are transitioning customers to SaaS solutions. The recent disclosure of global Cloud data mining by the US National Security Agency (NSA) has further fuelled concerns about industrial espionage in Europe and has significantly raised citizen awareness with respect to privacy and data custodianship. Any realistic attempt to address these concerns requires radical changes in data architectures and legislation.

Conclusion: While on-premises is still the dominant IT delivery model, Cloud is increasingly viewed as a robust complement or alternative. When evaluating new IT system and services ensure IT staff evaluate the use of Cloud as an alternative delivery model. The evaluation should include non-cost benefits, such as time-to-solution, rapid scale-up and scale-down, pay-as-you-go, as well as traditional metrics such as Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) and risk.

Rather than ask “Should we move to the cloud”, IT executives should ask “Why, What and When”, and then use these three questions to create a guidelines for comparing Cloud as an alternative delivery model to on-premises.

Conclusion: Organisations, large and small, have invested time and money over the past 5-10 years in improving ICT project success. Skilled project managers, governance groups, increased executive awareness and improved processes have all combined to improve the probability of a successful project. However, recognising when to cut the losses of a failing project is still a problem for many organisations. Either they never terminate a failing project or they delay in making the decision to terminate it. Either way the consequences can be devastating.

Conclusion: Search was always the most important utility online. Now it is moving into a new phase with higher functionality and relevance. In the next phase search will unite facts with opinions and personal needs. The umbrella term for this evolution is semantic search. When this search functionality is inside the devices consumers use it may be highly influential.

Organisations will confront search in two ways. Firstly, through the lock-in that users may demonstrate for the devices with the search function they prefer, and secondly, through a better context in which information is presented and through saliency.

Conclusion: The Mobile Document Library is one of the three most common generalised use cases. It provides an enterprise answer to the growing ‘drop box’ problem where users are utilising unmanaged public cloud services to gain mobile access to corporate documentation. While unchecked distribution of enterprise documents should be addressed, any solution put forward by IT must have a user experience that is at least as good as cloud-based, consumer-oriented solutions. In addition, the cost savings of automating mobile document distribution can often pay for a fleet of mobile devices: and therefore mobile document libraries can be used to introduce the foundations for a larger mobility initiative.

Conclusion: IT Managers and CIOs who are responsible for external-facing websites are faced by the difficult proposition of determining the optimal set of browsers and browser versions to support. Supporting too many browser platforms wastes money; supporting too few risks alienating users.

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