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Conclusion: Based on recent survey data and interviews conducted by IBRS, the position of Windows 8 in Australian enterprises is likely to be limited to specific use-cases and tablets / hybrid devices, or those with security policies that mandate N-2 versions of the desktop OS. As predicted, Windows 7 will dominate the enterprise and it is our prediction that Windows 7 is set to be the next Windows XP.

Conclusion: The business case for the use, acceptance and adoption of mobile financial transactions is that the provision of the technology will create its own demand. Some persuasion and marketing is required but essentially the convenience and innovation of the mobile handset is a powerful catalyst. Eventually technological force will transform the way society transacts. The main players expect to eliminate all loose change in every purse and pocket.

Such confidence is not entirely misplaced. The industry is using many channels to convince the public of the efficacy of the technology. However the basis of the business case may not be as secure as believed by its adherents and that may be a costly oversight.

Conclusion: It is tempting for the Executive when the IT Department’s processes are failing or systems are not being implemented on time to direct the CIO to engage an external provider. Whilst the need to act might be urgent CIOs must avoid making hasty decisions which could lead to the types of mistakes, set out below, occurring.

Conclusion: Wartime is fast approaching. Some would argue it is already happening around us, and CIOs will be in the firing line. Radically different business models, historically poor relationships with business areas and the confluence of transformational technologies mean that many CIOs will not be able to just incrementally improve operations to stay relevant but lead significant change or face being a casualty of war.

Conclusion: Although more attention is given to mobile payments, the delivery of services will probably gain wider traction and help promote all trust-based types of transaction. Under this umbrella of services should be added loyalty programs. For brand vendors, loyalty is two-way as they understand the appeal of mobile devices is not simply transactional. It has a subliminal emotional quality which can be used as a platform for commercial gain.

Organisations ought to have business strategies incorporating technical scope and feasibility for mobile services. Critical market mass is important. While smartphone penetration grows quickly planning for programs and services should be put in place. Over the next year is when concepts may be organised into well-developed strategies.

Some standards are undeniably useful, and the benefits of these standards can typically be quantified in terms of improvements in quality and productivity due to increases in the level of automation and interoperability. In contrast, other standards mainly fuel a certification industry that has developed around a standards body, without leading to any measurable benefits, whilst clearly adding to the operating costs of those organisations that choose to adopt such standards.

Conclusion: Increasingly, organisations are recognising that they can benefit from a so-called software product line approach. The transition from an IT organisation that operates entirely in project delivery mode to a product development organisation that introduces a product line governance process is a significant undertaking. The process involves the designers of business information services as well as Enterprise Architects and other domain experts. Achieving the benefits of a product line approach (systematic reuse of shared assets) requires the adoption of a dedicated product line engineering methodology to guide product management, design, development, and operations, and it also requires knowing where to draw the boundary between product development and the delivery of professional services.

Conclusion: Ticketing and other forms of transactions are essential elements to make other forms of non-cash and mobile financial transaction become habitual to customer behaviour. The familiarity of using the mobile device in such a way, with guaranteed security and convenience, is fundamental to user acceptance. It will help encourage all trust-based mobile interactions on a wider scale.

While smartcards have been seen as the transport ticketing solution there are risks and costs. Ticketing solutions built on smartphone platform is the obvious choice for transit authorities and other organisations that offer services to large groups of users and must manage their use of the service.

Frederick Herzberg, a psychologist who was very influential in management theory last century, created a model variously called the Motivation-Hygiene theory, or Two-Factor theory. The theory proposes that there are factors in the workplace which increase satisfaction, and there are other factors that decrease dissatisfaction; and that these factors may not be the same.

For example, when you stop hitting your head against a wall, your dissatisfaction will decrease, but you have not necessarily increased your satisfaction. I think that this model casts an interesting light on the challenge of mobility, and particularly around the ownership issue of BYOD accessing corporate data.

Conclusion: Many organisations approach Unified Communications as a singular initiative: a generic solution that will solve myriad business issues. One key tenet behind this thinking is that the unified communications will "unify" all aspects of communications, from voice and text chat to presence and video. In practice, however unified communications is best deployed to meet specific business cases, and does not actually need to be deeply integrated in order to achieve the benefits sought in many real business cases put forward. In summary, some of the best implementations of unified communications have not been unified at all.

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