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Conclusion: IT organisations' lack of IaaS usage planning will most likely increase consumption cost. As a result, IT organisations should work closely with business units to understand usage patterns and track monthly usage against forecasts. This will more likely ensure that IaaS usage levels remain within budget. This note provides the usage management framework. Part 2 planned for release in August 2014 will provide User Management maturity self-assessment approach.

Conclusion: A majority of organisations around the world and across Australia are implementing or trialling some form of Cloud service whether it be IaaS, PaaS or SaaS. While Cloud services offer many potential benefits to organisations they can increase complexity in a number of areas of IT service management. Organisations may implement a hybrid Cloud model and deliver some services using public or private Cloud.

Business areas may subscribe to Cloud services for the provision of application services with or without the participation of IT. Identifying and managing the schedule of change with a wide variety of providers can be complex but will provide the CIO and the organisation with a clear view of who, what, when, and how changes will be made, the risks involved and the mitigation actions required.

Conclusion: Moving services to the Cloud is a part of nearly all organisational strategic plans. Organisations today are either starting to trial services with one provider, moving from the trial phase to include additional services or heavily focussed on Cloud as part of their service delivery model.

Based on the learnings from organisations that are heavily focussed on the Cloud, CIOs will only be successful if they can successfully develop their maturity to be a competent customer of Cloud services. Developing an objective view of your organisation maturity level and actively seeking learnings from organisations that have already undertaken the journey will assist CIOs in developing an appropriate, actionable plan for their organisation.

Conclusions: Based on cost modelling, organisations looking to provide a ‘Windows virtual desktop’ experience should consider centralised, Windows Server OS based computing as opposed to Windows Desktop OS based computing. In addition to lower costs for hardware and simpler management and deployment, Windows Server OS based computing has a licensing model that can be just 25% of the cost of Windows Desktop OS based computing. Furthermore, Windows Server OS based computing licensing provides for greater freedom of where and on what devices the end-user desktop experience may be deployed.

Conclusion: Enterprise software vendors and enterprise software users are increasingly investing in in functionality that is accessible from mobile devices, and many organisations face the challenge of making key legacy applications accessible on mobile devices. Comprehensive and reliable APIs are the key for the creation of architectures that enable a seamless user experience across a range of mobile devices, and across a backend mix of state of the art Cloud services and legacy systems.

Conclusion: For many good reasons collaboration is seen as a means to improve productivity and kick-start innovation. Both productivity and innovation are how organisations can raise their effectiveness and competitive edge.

However, simply ‘doing collaboration’, as though it comes as a readymade solution, is a certainty to fail. Collaboration needs governance and management. The expectations have to be established and the tools to achieve an organisation’s goals need clarity and agreement. The biggest factor is people and culture, and how these respond and develop over time.

Conclusion: IT groups often seek to manage mobile device fleets using practices honed for desktops and laptops. These groups will find themselves facing eight significant challenges. Furthermore, as the mobile management field evolves, desktops and laptops will take on some mobile device management practices, rather than mobile devices being shoehorned into traditional desktop management practices.

Conclusion: In-house IT Service Management (ITSM) initiatives require considerable time and investment (up-to three years, up-to $1.5 million approximately). This has resulted in limited senior management continuous buy-in and reduced ITSM benefits realisation. Therefore, IT organisations wishing to implement ITSM should evaluate a public cloud alternative versus the cost and merits of establishing in-house service management capability.

Conclusion: Software Asset Management (SAM) is now a pressing issue for many organisations, due to growing complexities in vendor licensing as a result of the mix of: traditional per device, virtualisation, consumerisation, mobility, cloud services licensing models. SAM is no longer just a tracking service, but an essential part of financial and risk management. However, implementing SAM solutions must accompanied by the alignment of key business units. Processes – both for governance and automation – must be clearly defined between the key business units if SAM is to be of any lasting value.

Conclusion: Windows XP will not stop working in April 2014 when Microsoft stops supporting this popular operating system. However, as time passes, this OS will become an increasing burden on organisations, due to third party support, security challenges, increasingly specialised skillsets, and perception. Windows XP will quickly become a legacy environment, with all the associated challenges. Consequently, CIOs should have a clear plan for any remaining Windows XP machines. The value of a clear plan is two-fold: firstly for common understanding within the IT department, but also for communicating to stakeholders.

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