Peter Hall

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Peter Hall is an IBRS advisor who covers Enterprise Infrastructure and Management, managing vendor relationships and contracts, vendor capabilities and vendor offerings. Peter is also experienced in Start-Up’s and Mergers and Acquisitions. Peter has over 34 years of experience working in the IT sector in ANZ and Asia Pacific, gaining invaluable insights into Vendor offerings and strategies, relationship management, and channel strategies. Peter’s an experienced executive having worked for Hewlett-Packard, Blade Network Technologies (acquired by IBM in 2010), IBM and Lenovo.

Conclusion: Australian organisations and agencies need to embrace the European Union’s new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) legal framework for protecting and managing Private Individuals Information (PII). There is considerable risk to organisations that do not take action to comply, financially and to organisations’ brands.

There are also potential upsides in embracing the requirements and being able to demonstrate compliance with the accountability principles, and implementing both technical and organisational measures that ensure all processing activities comply with the GDPR.

Whilst Australian companies may already have practices in place that comply with the Australian Privacy Act 1988, GDPR has a number of additional requirements, including the potential appointment of “data protection officers”. Action should already be taking place, and organisations should not underestimate the time and effort it may take to reach and maintain compliance.


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Conclusion: Virtual Teams have become common in most organisations, and technology and globalisation have been the major enablers. Leaders and team participants have found themselves as participants by default and without choice.

For many, little training or education has been provided to help individuals recognise that their future work environment is going to change, and what new skills or competencies need to be developed.

To effectively utilise Virtual Teams, organisations need to develop a culture that recognises how teams will be used, what tools will be used for communication and collaboration, and education for both leaders and team members.


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Conclusion: Organisations deal with an array of ICT vendors, resellers, integrators or service providers. Prudent organisations will establish formal Supplier Relationship Management procedures to systematically manage the organisations’ interactions with suppliers, with goals of streamlining procedures and maximising effectiveness and value in these dealings.

Not all suppliers are equal in value, and SRM approaches for each should be measured in the effort applied.

A really effective SRM approach should enable an organisation to foster and grow strategic relationships with key suppliers capable of helping the organisation, for example, in driving competitive advantage. This would mean viewing the relationship with key suppliers as an asset and managing it as such. Organisations should also be aware of the risks in having too few strategic relationships which may stifle innovation or value over time.


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Conclusion: Mergers, acquisitions and divestitures are regular occurrences amongst ICT vendors. A lot of analysis of these announcements focuses on the potential impact on the future value of the organisations involved, particularly for investors. But each announcement means there will be changes for employees, customers and business partners.

Prudent organisations must be proactive and engaged in considering and debating how announced changes to suppliers could impact them, and assess for themselves the business implications of the potential scenarios that are likely to occur, and the risks or opportunities these present.

As each customer and business partner will have a unique relationship with the parties involved, they should do their own assessment, including seeking independent advice, of the potential ramifications of the announced changes.


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Conclusion: Organisations must proactively manage exactly which data is kept, secured, and backed up, as well as which data must be archived or permanently deleted. Data hoarding adds considerably to storage costs as well as potentially exposing organisations to risks especially if the data is inappropriate, unencrypted, or could put an organisation’s brand at risk.

Organisations need to have clear policies on exactly what sort of data is to be kept, especially when there are legal, regulatory or other specific reasons for keeping the data. Additionally, organisations need to be clear on what should not be kept.

Organisations cannot leave the management of this issue at simply expecting compliance to a policy. Business stakeholders must be closely involved in defining the business imperative for tracking data relevance and the value of data. Data specialists equipped with the appropriate tools will be required to specifically find data and manage it based on defined policies.


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Conclusion: Community Clouds can provide the expected value of using “Cloud”-based services in a shared environment that may be more economical than a closed private Cloud or privately owned and managed IT solutions. But economics may not be the driving factor. Identifying a common “customer” need or client base can be the main driver to getting similar organisations to agree to use shared resources or services.

The effort in getting organisations to recognise the opportunity to work together and to actually implement a community Cloud should not be underestimated. As in arranging car pooling, whilst the benefits may be clear, there is still the challenge of finding the other participants who all want to go to the same place, at the same time, and with agreed cost sharing. A “lead” organisation is necessary to help coordinate the required effort to create a Community Cloud.


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Conclusion: ICT vendors invest in training their Account Managers or Sellers to be “Trusted Advisors”. The training is to improve the seller’s skill to be able to help their clients achieve success both in business and at a professional level. A client organisation’s expectations are that the vendors should at best be “Competent Advisors” in terms of the solutions or products they represent. Few, if any, employees in client organisations are relying on or expecting their success to be based on the strength of a “Trusted Advisor” from a vendor.

Few sellers can ever achieve the highly valued position of being a true “Trusted Advisor”. The way vendors manage and reward their “sellers” generally has nothing to do with the client recognising them as a “Trusted Advisor”.

Sellers from vendors know their primary measures are on their sales results. This is what their management really expects them to be focusing on and achieving.


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Conclusion: The introduction of Software Defined Networking (SDN) offerings touted a number of benefits around simpler and more agile network management and provisioning, lowering capital and operational costs.


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Conclusion: Organisations considering applications migration to a Cloud service provider may lack the experience to understand potential risks or how to select a service provider. This may result in budget overrun or inability to meet business needs.

While planning to engage a service provider, a “Plan B” (to invoke in case of failure) is needed to strengthen the project plan’s foundation and mitigate risks. The process of developing the alternative plan helps define potential risks to consider, and what success or failure will look like. Costing out the alternative plan will also help in assessing the financial benefits and costs.


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