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Peter Hall

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Peter Hall is an IBRS advisor who covers Enterprise Infrastructure and Management, managing vendor and customer relationships and contracts, vendor capabilities and vendor offerings. Peter is also experienced in Start-Up’s and Mergers and Acquisitions. Peter has over 35 years of experience working in the IT sector in ANZ and Asia Pacific, gaining invaluable insights into vendor offerings and strategies, relationship management, and channel strategies. Peter’s an experienced executive having worked for Hewlett-Packard, Blade Network Technologies (acquired by IBM in 2010), IBM and Lenovo. Peter is also an accredited Tony Buzan Licensed Instructor in Mind Mapping.

Conclusion: The forthcoming General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) legislation is being introduced by the European Union (EU), which has ramifications to organisations worldwide.

Key aspects of GDPR relate specifically to what data exactly an organisation should be able to legally keep and for how long. The underlying principle is that less is best in terms of data collected and kept. For the data to have been legally collected, an individual has to have explicitly given their consent to the organisation to collect, keep and process their personal data.


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Conclusion: The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) legislation being introduced by the European Union (EU) in May has ramifications to organisations worldwide.

Australian organisations that have already invested in ensuring that they comply with the Australian Privacy Act 1988, and have a robust privacy management framework in place, may find that they already comply with aspects of the EU’s GDPR. However, GDPR does have more stringent requirements including requirements that are not within the Australian requirements, so effort and investment will be required by organisations that need to comply with GDPR.

When considering an organisation’s position and defensibility in terms of whether they complied or not, organisations will need to develop an understanding of the specific requirements, and how exactly they have implemented “technical and organisational measures to show that they have considered and integrated data protection into their processing activities”1.


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Conclusion: The forthcoming General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is new legislation being introduced by the European Union, which does have ramifications for organisations worldwide.

Being new, there is still a lot to be learned about what exactly some of the specific requirements will mean in practice and how they will impact organisations in being able to show that they have understood and completely complied with the regulation.

When considering an organisation’s position and defensibility in terms of did they comply or not, organisations will need to develop an understanding on the specific requirements, and how exactly they have implemented “technical and organisational measures to show that they have considered and integrated data protection into their processing activities”1.


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Many organisations are wanting to drive innovation, encourage creative thinking skills and boost productivity. Mind
Mapping is a proven technique that helps individuals and teams improve their creative thinking skills.
 
This course will help you understand Mind Mapping Skills and how to apply them for work purposes. 

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Conclusion: Achieving the ability to comply with the new European General Data Protection Regulation is seen as a costly and burdensome overhead adding a new layer of complexity to how organisations will need to manage and secure Personally Identifiable Information (PII) records kept by them.

However, organisations should view the potential benefits of being able to use obtaining and maintaining the ability to comply with GDPR as an opportunity to justify investments in technologies, process improvements and people to deliver better overall outcomes for the organisation.

Rather than simply focusing on doing what is required to be able to comply, focus should be on using the opportunity to update tools and processes to improve organisational efficiencies, reduce costs, increase customer and employee loyalty, and improve productivity.


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Conclusion: Organisations know that they have legal obligations in terms of record retention and privacy. The foundation of good information management governance is an effective record retention schedule (RRS). Organisations need to regularly review and audit their RRS not only in terms of it being current, but also in terms of it being effective and being complied with.

An effective schedule is one that is being complied with, is easy to understand, meets all legal and regulatory requirements and allows for effective record discovery or e-discovery if required.

Effective management of records is an organisational issue, not an IT issue. IT makes a contribution in provisioning solutions to assist in the management of digital records or helping convert non-digital records into digital records as appropriate. IT also needs to determine the best practices for managing data based on its value rather than its volume.1


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Conclusion: Managing large IT environments and provisioning IT services within an organisation is complex and complexity will always exist. However, not all complexity is “bad”. “Good” complexity is the complexity required to simplify, to reduce costs, create value, improve security and improve overall operations and results.

Focus needs to always be maintained on reducing “bad” complexity. “Bad” complexity is the complexity that makes it difficult to do things, difficult to secure, difficult to manage, difficult to innovate, or difficult to adapt to changes in the organisation. “Bad” complexity comes with high costs, including hidden costs in lost employee productivity and morale, potentially loss of new business opportunities, or higher staffing costs due to the limited availability of the skills needed.

Organisations need to maintain a mindset of constantly managing initiatives to drive towards simplification in their IT portfolio, understanding that achieving this will involve sophisticated and often complex planning and the successful execution of those plans.


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Conclusion: Mind mapping is a popular technique to assist with the thinking ability of an individual or team, and to help generate ideas and thoughts. Mind maps literally involve “mapping” out thoughts, using associations, connections and triggers to stimulate further ideas.

Whilst traditional mind maps have been drawn on paper, the availability of mind mapping software provides platforms that can be used within organisations to improve the productivity and creativity of individuals and teams. Additionally, it is possible to do things with digital mind maps that are not possible with a hand-drawn diagram, especially in the area of team collaboration, dynamic links and exporting to other formats such as presentations, websites or project plans.

Standardising on a particular mind mapping application can provide a powerful collaboration tool for all employees in the organisation1. With so many choices available, organisations should define their needs and select an application that best integrates with how they expect to deploy mind mapping.


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Conclusion: Mind mapping is used broadly throughout the world as a technique for improving creativity, problem solving, organising, planning, learning and collaborating. It can be used effectively to help an individual with their personal productivity, and importantly it can help teams and whole organisations.

If organisations are going to embrace mind mapping and encourage employees to utilise this proven technique, then it should manage the rollout like it would for any other major new initiative. A specific training program needs to be utilised, and if software is to be used to enable collaboration via Mind Maps, the organisation will need to determine an approach and evaluate potential applications from the growing list of mind mapping applications becoming available.


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Conclusion: Whilst the forthcoming General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a European regulation, some Australian organisations are likely to be impacted and will need to comply. One of the requirements of the regulation is to appoint a Data Protection Officer (DPO), whose job role has very specific duties and legal responsibilities which are defined as part of the GDPR.

However, the guidelines are not completely clear as to when it is mandatory for an organisation to appoint a DPO. Australian organisations should consider if, 1: will they need to comply with the GDPR, and, 2: will they need to appoint a DPO?


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