Phil Hassey

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Conclusion: Location, or geospatial information, is a central but significantly under-utilised element of the volume of data created and leveraged by organisations. Location information is simply presented and leveraged as text, e.g. an address. But location information is not just about where an asset or activity is located, but rather, where it is located in relation to other assets or activity. That relationship is best presented visually.


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Conclusion: With cumulative revenue in excess of $1 billion, and penetration into the majority of ASX50 organisations,Indian based IT service providers are clearly a well-established and credentialed participant in the Australian IT environment. The adoption of these vendors by Australian organisations has continued to accelerate in recent years. An increased challenge for current and prospective customers is to understand the implications of evolving Indian provider capability and investment.


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Conclusion: A competency centre for Business Intelligence (BI) must have an active mandate and involvement from the senior executive to sustain optimised delivery of the organisational BI strategy. This leadership is a key factor in the ability to successfully deliver the initial benefits of the competency centre within a three month development period, establishing long term benefits.


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Conclusion: The implementation of, and ongoing investment in Business Intelligence (BI) solutions have regularly failed to meet organisational expectations, both in terms of business outcomes and cost1. Further highlighting this, the most recent Gartner predictions for 2012 highlight that by 2015, more than 85% of Fortune 500 companies will have failed to effectively exploit Big Data (and by extension BI) to achieve competitive advantage2. As an outcome, consideration of the establishment of a BI Competency Centre is relevant for a large number of organisations who wish to improve outcomes of BI within their organisation. The establishment of the centre of excellence can align resources, focus capabilities and ensure education of projects and processes are shared across the organisation.


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Conclusion: The implementation of Business Intelligence is critical to the optimised operation of even the most basic business functions. When executed well it provides quantifiable competitive advantage for private sector organisations, and improved service delivery outcomes for the public sector.

IT has a significant opportunity to enhance its business relevance by ensuring that Business Intelligence best practice is active and transparent across the organisation. Organisations without a comprehensive investment and capability in Business Intelligence will struggle to complete and will operate below their potential.


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Conclusion: Gainshare models have started to emerge as a way of evolving IT and BPO outsourcing and increasing measureable financial benefits of outsourcing. Gainshare is immature and not without challenges, but can be a proof point of a mature outsourcing philosophy by an organisation.


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Conclusion: Despite a long history of IT Infrastructure and applications outsourcing in Australia and New Zealand, too many outsourcing contracts fail to maximise client outcomes due to a range of factors that are fundamentally easy to overcome. Improved outcomes start with improved process up front. Organisational failure to identify and leverage appropriate resources, in parallel with hard deadlines that are too tight to clarify the appropriate level of complexity, provide the wrong environment to start to generate value. The organisation must focus limited upfront resources on the fundamental business and technology issues that will generate the most value from the outsourcing relationship, and not waste resources on those factors that have limited long term value or potential downside.


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Conclusion: For outsourced IT or business processes, innovation that is measurable and practical must be managed and aligned with your outsourcing provider. The further up the business value chain you engage in offshoring and outsourcing, the more critical this development and integration of innovation becomes. Unfortunately in practice this has proven more difficult. As a result, innovation in outsourcing contracts has been lacking. This lack of success has led to questions around the actual potential for outsourcing to provide innovation. of the actual capability for outsourcing and innovation.


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Conclusion: Investment in meeting room management systems is becoming increasingly important for organisations looking to modernise and optimise their facilities. It is however a complex investment. The investment will fail if appropriate stakeholders’ perspectives are not included in the process and if an objective analysis of user requirements fails to occur. When executed correctly, the definition of a meeting room can be expanded, ensuring efficient use of assets such as car parks, lockers and technology.


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Conclusion: Australian IT organisations should be setting the bar higher to extract maximum value from outsourcing arrangements. Furthermore, if the level of outcomes for many providers has been exceeded, it is often only because those expectations were set so low, with a focus on organisations pushing off low-hanging IT functions.

Clearly the blame in allowing the sub-optimal outcomes to occur is shared by both vendor and customer. Organisations must ensure that they are evolving the way in which they manage their outsourcing vendors to take advantage of cloud and utility based service delivery.


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The CIO walks into the boardroom. He proudly tells the board that he‘s hired “Global System Integration Leader” to be the prime SI for the organisation’s upgraded ERP system. The board fires him on the spot. When he asks for an explanation for his firing, the board tells him that it’s the third time that he’s hired the “Global System Integration Leader” for a major system integration engagement and the first two times failed to achieve objectives. He wouldn’t get a third chance. As he made his way to the lift well he was heard to exclaim in a loud high pitched voice; “But you don’t understand, they get it right once in every three times – they’re due”.


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Conclusion: Outsourcing remains a core service delivery model for a significant number of Australian firms. As outsourcing evolves to encompass cloud based services alongside traditional infrastructure outsourcing and managed services relationships, options for the CIO have increased rapidly.


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Conclusion: Despite its position as the second largest IT services provider in Australia, and the largest in New Zealand, Hewlett Packard (HP) does not have a consistent or mature end to end IT and business service delivery capability across its services lines in Australia and New Zealand (ANZ).

Future customer confidence in the IT Outsourcing business of HP is reliant in part upon the completion of announced investment in data centres in both countries. It is the opinion of HP’s customers and prospects that its application, industry and Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) based services requires a similar investment and focus to the IT outsourcing business.


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Conclusion: In 2011 Chinese based IT services providers will start to appear in the Australian IT marketplace. Clearly, their impact will be modest at first, although for certain organisations, there is the potential to benefit from engagement.

While they use Indian based firms as benchmarks, Chinese firms are significantly different from the Indian based services providers. Despite sharing the same offshoring based model, Chinese firms are more engineering focused and significantly less mature. You must be aware that engagement of Chinese providers will have specific engagement benefits and challenges.


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