The Latest

19 Nov 2020: During its annual summit, Snowflake announces a series of new capabilities: a development environment called Snowpark, support for unstructured media, row-level security for improved data governance and a data market.

Why it’s Important

Of Snowflake’s recent announcements, Snowpark clearly reveals the vendor’s strategy to leverage its Cloud analytics platform to enable the development of data-intensive applications. Snowpark allows developers to write applications in their preferred languages to access information in the Snowflake data platform.

This represents an inversion of how business intelligence / analytics teams have traditionally viewed the role of a data warehouse. The rise of data warehouses was driven by limitations in computing performance: heavy analytical workloads were shifted to a dedicated platform so that application performance would not be impacted by limits of database, storage and compute power. With Cloud-native data platform architectures that remove these limitations, it is now possible to leverage the data warehouse (or at least, the analogue of what the data warehouse has become) to service applications.

Who’s Impacted

Development teams
Business intelligence / analytics architects

What’s Next?

Snowflake's strategy is evidence of a seismic shift in data analytics architecture. Along with Domo, AWS, Microsoft Azure, Google and other Cloud-based data platforms that take advantage of highly scalable, federated architectures, Snowflake is empowering a flip in how data can be leveraged. To take advantage of this flip, organisations should rethink the structure and roles within BI / analytics teams. IBRS has noted that many organisations continue to invest heavily in building their BI / analytics architecture with individual best-of-breed solutions (storage, databases, warehouse, analytics tools, etc), while placing less focus on the data scientists and business domain experts. With access to elastic Cloud platforms, organisations can reverse this focus - putting the business specialists and data scientists in the lead. 

Related IBRS Advisory
Workforce transformation: The four operating models of business intelligence
Key lessons from the executive roundtable on data, analytics and business value

The Latest

To cater for organisations with requirements to keep data in-country, VMware has opened a Sydney based Point of Presence (PoP) for Carbon Black Cloud in the AWS Sydney data centre. Carbon Black Cloud offers end-point security, which provides behaviour based analysis of devices. 

Why it’s Important

The market for end-point security based on behavioural analytics is growing quickly. However, it relies upon hyper scale Cloud or Cloud-like resources. The paradox is that risk-averse organisations that can benefit from this type of endpoint protection are reticent to allow as-a-Service solutions not based domestically to have access to sensitive information about their staff activities. By opening a Sydney based PoP for Carbon Black Cloud, VMware removes a policy barrier to this type of end-point security. 

Who’s Impacted

  • Desktop / digital workplace leads
  • CISO / security teams

What’s Next?

Carbon Black Cloud is one of a growing list of technology offerings in end-point security that leverage Cloud computing and AI. This market will grow rapidly as remote and hybrid working environments become a permanent part of the economy. And rightly so. In principle, IBRS does not see that data geolocation (keeping data domestically) significantly improves an organisation’s security stance, though it may provide regulatory compliance. Latency issues, especially for high-volume services, are also a consideration.

In practice, many organisations still need to address legacy policy regarding information management, and so the trend towards vendors setting up local data processing operations will continue..  

Related IBRS Advisory

  1. Embracing security evolution with zero trust networking
  2. What is the security agenda for 2019?
  3. When it comes to security, when is enough... enough?

IBRS advisor Dr Wissam Raffoul, who specialises in transforming IT groups into service organisations, said legacy tech stacks had a lot of 'single point failures' which could bring whole systems to their knees.

Full story.

IBRS iQ is a database of Client inquiries and is designed to get you talking to our Advisors about these topics in the context of your organisation in order to provide tailored advice for your needs.

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Conclusion: Despite decades of investment in new technologies and the promise of 'digital transformation', workforce productivity has languished. The problem is that technological change does not equate to process nor practice change. Put simply, doing the same things with new tools will not deliver new outcomes.

The mass move to working from home has forced a wave of change to practices: people are finally shifting from a sequential approach to work to a genuinely collaborative approach. And this work approach will remain even as staff return to the office.

The emerging wave through 2020 and beyond is process change: continual and iterative digitisation of process. Practice and process changes will be two positive legacies of the pandemic.

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The Latest

13 Nov 2020: Google Cloud announced preview availability of a serverless Database Migration Service (DMS), which enables clients to migrate MySQL, PostgreSQL, and SQL Server databases to Cloud SQL from on-premises environments or other clouds. 

Why it's Important 

Refactoring applications to take advantage of Cloud-native databases is one of the fastest cost-optimisation opportunities for organisations migrating to Cloud services. Cloud-native databases offer cost-efficiencies in both technical terms (e.g. storage costs) and operational savings (e.g. auto-tuning and scaling). However, the cost of migrating can be a sticking point in the development of business cases, especially where specialised outside help is required. 

Google DMS addresses the above by simplifying and reducing the cost of database migration. It eliminates the need to provision migration-specific compute resources.

Azure and AWS have their own database migration approaches, and even though Google’s solution is in its infancy, it has a solid road map.

Who’s Impacted

Organisations with Adobe Marketing Cloud and related investments, and Workfront customers.

  • Enterprise Architects
  • Cloud Migration / Strategic leads

What’s Next

Organisations with Cloud migration strategies should be comparing how to not only optimise the cost of running Cloud databases, but also the cost and agility of migration. This consideration should not rest upon one use case, but assume that an increasing number of databases will be migrated over time, both from on-premise and from other Cloud providers.  

Close ‘like-for-like’ calculations suggest that Google’s MySQL database services are lower than that of both Azure and AWS, though direction comparisons are difficult given the number of possible configurations. Therefore, while Google is not a major Cloud player in the ANZ region (compared to AWS and Azure) it can be considered as an option for cost-optimisation in a multi-Cloud setting.

Related IBRS Advisory

The Latest

10 Nov 2020: Microsoft has announced the general availability of its Data Loss Prevention (DLP) services. The DLP services are being rolled out to Office 365 customers with E3 and E5 licensing (see details on licensing below). Microsoft also introduced additional features for its DLP service, including: 

  • Sensitivity labels for DLP policies
  • Dashboard within Microsoft 365 compliance center to manage DLP alerts 
  • New conditions and exceptions for mail flow rules

Why it’s Important

The rapid introduction of collaboration tools has opened new vectors for data leakage. This was a particular worry of participants in IBRS’s recent Teams Governance Peer Roundtable, with 67% of executives having data leakage concerns. The current approach to reducing data leakage from products such as Teams is to block sharing and collaboration with external parties. While this does limit data leakage, it also eliminates one of the key benefits of new collaboration tools: the ability to create borderless work environments. 

What’s covered

E3 licensing provides DLP for Exchange Online, SharePoint Online and OneDrive. However, organistions will need E5 licensing for access DLP for Teams Chat and Devices/ Endpoint.

Who’s Impacted

Organisations with Office 365 or Microsoft 365 investments. 

  • Desktop / digital workplace lead
  • Office 365 deployment leads / administrators
  • Information management teams
  • CISO

What’s Next?

Microsoft’s general release of DLP, under existing E3 and E5 licensing levels, is a potent step to addressing collaboration’s woes. While Microsoft’s DLP is not as feature laden as dedicated competitive offerings, it requires no additional budget. Effectively, Microsoft is pushing DLP down into the broader market, to organisations that may not have previously considered such solutions. Along with Microsoft Information Protection (MIP),  Microsoft DLP should be investigated as a priority feature for Office 365 deployments, especially where Microsoft Teams is being deployed with guest access enabled.

Related IBRS Advisory

The Latest
9 Nov 2020: Adobe announced a commitment to purchase Workfront for USD1.5b. The deal will bring Workfront’s marketing workflow and collaboration solutions into Adobe’s portfolio of ecommerce, content creation and delivery solutions.

Why it's Important
Adobe is the leader in the marketing technology landscape, with a wide portfolio of solutions for content creation and delivery. In the last three years, Adobe has aggressively pursued design and ecommerce automation through AI and related technologies. The addition of Workfront to its portfolio brings collaboration and workflow into the mix. The likely result being AI powered decision-making into marketing workflows.

Who’s Impacted
Organisations with Adobe Marketing Cloud and related investments, and Workfront customers.

  • eCommerce / marketing technology leads

What’s Next
Workfront and Adobe have a history of collaboration and there are cultural synergies that will likely make the merger relatively seamless from a customer perspective. In the near term (2-3 years), Workfront clients will not see a significant shift in product direction nor licensing. However, as Adobe leverages its AI capabilities into Workfront, expect to see new capabilities that benefit Adobe Marketing Cloud, Experience Manager and other products in the Adobe suite. Longer term, Workforce clients (many of whom are already Adobe clients) should prepare for the more assertive licensing audit activities for which Adobe is known.

Related IBRS Advisory

Conclusion: This month, discussions regarding a heightened demand for managed security services have been prominent – in particular, around vulnerability and penetration assessments, mitigation frameworks, response and recovery protocols, as well as response consolidation and training. Customers have long recognised the need to ensure systems are protected from inappropriate access. However, internal business preparedness, recovery and continuity plans have caused vulnerabilities in the past. A greater number, frequency and awareness of security incidents have prompted vendors to integrate security services with a customer’s business operations and business preparedness plans, with a focus on response and continuity. This has resulted in the provision of high-quality offerings, delivery models and ongoing support, with an increased customer adoption and integration with existing business operations.

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Conclusion: To respond to the COVID-19 outbreak in Australia, organisations are left with no alternative but to improve their internal efficiency to continue meeting their committed service levels while facing a constant drop in headcount1. However, sustaining the efficiency gains once acquired requires high-availability and efficient services that meet business operations imperatives. This demands avoiding outages that require significant manual effort to recover services while dealing with possible embarrassment in the media. IT organisations should develop a risk profile for every critical service and alert the possible exposures to business executives. The focus of the risk profile is to avoid increased overheads while maintaining service levels. The outcome should be a mitigation strategy that is acceptable to business executives, clients, business partners and government agencies.

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Conclusion: Organisations using Microsoft Server licences should consider leveraging the full potential of recent developments in the AWS licence suite. For more than a decade, AWS Cloud services have provided different organisations reliable data servicing and fewer downtime hours. AWS suggests that it offers clients more instances and twice the performance rate on SQL servers compared to other Cloud providers. Clients will need to have a performance rating in mind to validate these services for their own use.

Over the past decade, AWS has sought to innovate its processes and features following customer feedback. For example, the AWS License Manager was developed after customer feedback as a one-stop solution that manages usage limits and enables IT licensing optimisation across a variety of software vendors and across hybrid environments. It is important for customers to compare this licence management solution with other Cloud providers to validate the additional benefits.

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Conclusion: All organisations need to identify the value of their procurement portfolio. That is, to document and regularly review the portfolio to understand both the criticality of the contracts to business and the triggers that decide whether the technology is meeting the need and when actions need to be put in place to limit the risk to the business in the acquisition process.

With an improved situational awareness of the procurement portfolio, organisations then need to ensure alignment with the business strategy. The alignment can only be achieved with regular independent reviews, and by effective governance processes to ensure that the risk associated with procurement planning is contained.

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Conclusion: SAP ECC on-premise versions required ownership of ERP infrastructure and multi-year licensing. The business cases for such investments considered ERP systems essential to remain competitive in IT service industries, logistics and resource-intensive sectors.

The next stage of the SAP journey recognises that Cloud infrastructure associated with S/4HANA can remove the large capital investment and reduce operating costs. Even with this infrastructure saving, the data migration risk remained with CIOs looking to identify a reliable data migration method. Any data migration considered to be high risk should be avoided in the current environment. Many are unfamiliar with the best method to migrate from on-premise SAP solutions to SAP S/4HANA in the Cloud.

SAP and its partners are now making this data migration journey not only more transparent but achievable in a timeframe that is measured in months not years. This is being achieved through Cloud platforms that can interrogate and integrate legacy data, then present migration paths in real time whilst retaining the data integrity before, during and after the migration.

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Conclusion: ‘Voice of the customer’ (VoC) programs often involve the collection and analysis of data through feedback, research and analytics. This can provide an organisation with a strong view of customer desires, pain points, improvement opportunities and new product opportunities. However, this approach does not provide insight into whether these desires, pain points and ideas are shared by your employees. It also does not tell you whether these ideas are easy to implement or if they are achievable. In part, these are the reasons why only 24 % of large firms think they are good at making changes to the business based on insights captured through their VoC programs1.

Many organisations invest in employee engagement programs and initiatives, without realising the full benefit (i. e. action) of this investment2. This paper explores how, by capturing the voice of your staff as a component of your VoC program, organisations can increase the practical value of insights collected, expedite the road to implementation and focus on targeted, achievable action.

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Conclusion: At the start of 2020, businesses had carefully-devised strategies in place which had been put together the year before. The onslaught of the global pandemic has either put these strategies to the test or caused them to be scrapped completely. The coronavirus has imposed changes everywhere we look and across different industries. Some businesses were forced to close shop. Others have been on a path of fast-tracked innovation and transformation. Before the pandemic, organisational behaviour had been structured to usher in growth and expansion. Although these are still valid goals, another factor has been added and that is survival.

With an economic crisis looming, consumer behaviour will inevitably change. Building and rebuilding the business requires its executives to be resilient and agile. A change in mindset is key. Alternative perspectives are relevant in pivoting in this new normal. After the period of adjustment has set in, managing IT may look different from how things were previously done.

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Conclusion: As organisations strive to enhance customer experience, complemented by marketing and sales activities, success will be contingent on IT and business professionals using data literacy skills and being able to implement systems that make it easy to do business with them and understand their buying patterns.

Unless IT and business professionals acquire the data literacy skills needed, and make the right data available, efforts to better engage with customers and prospects will fail to achieve expectations and opportunities will be wasted.

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Conclusion: Security breaches by insiders, whether deliberate or accidental, are on the increase and their consequences can be just as catastrophic as other types of security incidents. Organisations are typically reluctant to disclose insider security breaches and as a result, these breaches receive relatively little media attention. The insider threat may therefore be perceived as being of secondary importance in an organisation’s cyber security program. However, given the consequences, organisations need to ensure that this risk is given sufficient executive attention and resourcing.

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Conclusion: Passwords will continue to be part of the landscape for the foreseeable future. Organisations, driven by the concepts of defence in depth, must implement techniques that enhance the security of the authentication process. Both products and processes can be enabled or added to help secure the creation, use and storage of passwords.

Each of the techniques mentioned can be used on their own to enrich the security. Some or all of them can be combined to further build the security. Most of them have little associated costs apart from deployment and perhaps training, but the cumulative impact on the robustness of the authentication process is significant.

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IBRS iQ is a database of Client inquiries and is designed to get you talking to our Advisors about these topics in the context of your organisation in order to provide tailored advice for your needs.

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Conclusion: Cyber incidents and the protection of information have now taken enterprise and national significance. 

Organisations will need to learn to operate securely in a zero trust world. With an ever-increasing number of cyber-related incidents, cyber security risk has evolved from a technical risk to a strategic enterprise risk. The risk of a compromise for most organisations is increasing with the acceleration of digital transformation, adoption of technologies such as Cloud services, analytics and IoT. The threat landscape is further compounded by increased regulatory and compliance requirements.

A cyber compromise is almost inevitable and organisations are now focusing on improving the resilience of their organisation to a cyber incident. Many organisations now have cyber resilience programs in place which not only protect and defend their key information assets but are also well placed to respond should a cyber incident occur. Our cyber strategy, roadmap and implementation advisory are designed to assist on your cyber resilience journey.

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Conclusion: As-a-Service solutions offer organisations agility, flexibility and scalability but the graveyard of unused software piling up should ring alarm bells. Neglected software utilisation and compliance will be factors that should drive a new Software Asset Management (SAM) investment. The impact of an unmanaged Cloud SaaS or IaaS solution will be quickly revealed during audits. At a time when management is a focus, this should be an easy win.

Organisations will need to quickly identify if they are running single or multi-tenanted instances and whether production and non-production environments are being managed efficiently for the purposes of SAM product selection.

Selecting a SAM tool should be proportionate to the cost of non-compliance. Unmitigated software licence costs can be eye-watering. Consider these factors when selecting your SAM product for Information Technology Asset Management (ITAM):

  1. Data points
  2. Software overspend
  3. Inefficiency
  4. Compliance

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Conclusion: Governance committees face a number of challenges that can undermine their effectiveness. These challenges include groupthink, a focus on individual responsibilities rather than organisation-wide benefits, trust issues and a lack of knowledge of emerging issues and opportunities. Appropriately qualified and experienced independent external advisors can play an important role in overcoming these challenges.

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Conclusion: People are and will be using passwords for the foreseeable future despite the numerous efforts underway to dispense with them. Managing them and particularly resetting them are ongoing costs for organisations.

Passwords are also a significant contributor to breaches. They are either captured during credential-grabbing efforts, leaked in a data breach or just too easy to guess.

Yet there are excellent guidelines in existence to assist people to minimise the possibility of passwords being cracked or guessed. Some involve implementing good policies, and most involve making it easier for users to create, remember and use passwords.

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Conclusion: In the modern world, no organisation has ICT entirely in-sourced. As a result, procurement, contract and vendor management have become strategic processes that allow organisations to align their ICT capability with the business strategy to achieve the desired outcomes, both now and into the future.

It is often the case that effective planning for the procurement of technology capability is compressed or constrained such that procurement is not able to effect ‘big step’ change. Or the commercial approach means the agreement is based on a fixed term, which results in the procurement not being a strategic exercise. More often than not, the procurement delivers constraints that limit the business’s ability to achieve the desired outcomes. These constraints limit the business’s ability to be agile in terms of elasticity, or how well it can respond to disruption in the market.

The technology options to meet business demand are not the same today as they were yesterday, and they will undoubtedly differ tomorrow. The challenge is to ensure ICT procurement is responsive to the business strategy, and that vendors share in the advantage a strategic alliance brings to the business. Procurement needs to be effectively planned and clearly aligned to the business strategy to ensure the strategy is delivered effectively.

This paper is the first in a four-part series on how to ensure procurement meets the business need, gain an understanding of strategic versus tactical procurement, and will define the steps necessary to avoid the pitfalls that cause procurements to under-deliver.

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Conclusion: Many organisations are engaged in implementing digital transformation programs to provide enhanced customer services, e. g. with new products or to reduce operating costs, or both. Unfortunately, many programs fail, sometimes repeatedly, until they achieve their set objectives. What is important though is when failure occurs, use the lessons learned to try again.

Delivering a transformed organisation is hard as it is inevitably accompanied by:

  • Redesigning business processes to meet today’s business imperatives
  • Implementing enhanced information systems
  • Encouraging employees to acquire new skills and be innovative
  • Actively minimising the business risks

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Conclusion: Growing use of SaaS-based, low-code application development platforms will accelerate digital process innovation. However, embracing citizen developers (non-IT people who create simple but significant forms-based applications and workflows) creates issues around governance: including security, process standardisation, data quality, financial controls, integration and potentially single points of failure. There is also a need for new app integrations and service features for its stakeholders that need to be addressed before the potential for citizen developers can be fully realised.

If governed properly, low-code platforms and citizen developers can accelerate digital transformation (or at least, digitisation of processes) and in turn alleviate the load on traditional in-house development teams.

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Conclusion: This month, there has been an increased focus on the impact of external environments and customer demands on managed services providers and their offerings. An increased demand for hybrid working solutions, remote operations and connectivity solutions has driven a greater demand for associated services such as security, Cloud and platforms. Customers have been searching for targeted and combined solutions to help address business needs and increase operational efficiencies. For those vendors that put an emphasis on meaningful customer relationships and interactions, maintaining open and clear communications and the capacity to adapt to client needs is critical. A customer with a heavy reliance on legacy systems for key business processes may find this raises challenges or is simply no longer feasible in the current climate. Service providers must be ready to work with clients that need to adapt or completely overhaul in order to provide the necessary support in difficult times. 

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Conclusion: As a result of the COVID-19 outbreak in Australia, many businesses’ income has been reduced, approximately 800,000 people have been made redundant and the IT budget has been significantly cut. IT organisations are left with no alternative but to improve their internal efficiency to continue meeting their committed service levels while facing a constant drop in headcount. To survive under these budget limitations during the next two years, IT must focus on efficiency quick wins that opt to reduce costs, automate highly manual activities and mitigate critical risk that may lead to service breakdowns, which in turn require significant human effort to rectify. The quick wins should be implemented within 18 months to realise the desired effect. An efficiency improvement task force should be established to make it all happen. 

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Conclusion: The coming global recession will see ICT budgets cut, or at least constrained, in the 2021 financial year through to 2023. CIOs are now inundated with advice that boils down to this singular direction for efficiency and mostly, for survival. Although sound, this advice does not take into consideration that many CIOs have long been practising cost-efficiency. Many IT shops are already cut to the bone.

IT projects will be on the chopping block. Hence, it is crucial to prioritise now – before the cuts are mandated – which IT projects can be shelved for a few years without unacceptable risks to the organisation. It is important to note here that postponing or cancelling projects is being framed as a business risk decision. The CIO’s role is to put forward the risks of delaying or killing off a project, not to be the sole arbitrator. 

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Conclusion: In August 2020, IBRS ran a roundtable on the issue of Microsoft Support service, and specifically options for obtaining services in the most effective manner. 

The replacement of Microsoft's traditional Premier Support programs for its Unified Support program is well underway. For many organisations, the new program is a strong fit, offering a wide range of services and unlimited reactive support inquiries for a fee that is directly proportional to their Microsoft software and platform investment.  

However, for others, the program is not an ideal or cost-effective fit. During the roundtable, 16 peers shared their stories of how they have approached Microsoft support in the new era and a set of practical recommendations was developed. 

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Conclusion: Estimating the workdays for an agile- or waterfall-based IT project is not a simple task. However, with effort and a disciplined people-focused approach, it can be turned from an art into, as close as possible, a science.

When the effort is made, management will become more comfortable with the resources needed to complete projects and avoid the unpleasant task of asking for more resources than expected due to flawed estimating.

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Conclusion: The massive shift to working from home since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic has led to upsides for employees: more flexibility, no commute and greater productivity. Many executives have been publicly extolling the virtues of remote working. However, a number of management, cultural and work design issues are now starting to emerge. Organisations need to review their current workplace design and practices and prepare for a hybrid home-office workplace post-pandemic.

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Conclusion: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in prolonged lockdowns and quarantines, limiting economic activity and resulting in closure of businesses and many people losing their jobs. Various institutions around the world are unanimous in predicting that a recession is on its way, if not already here. Unless a vaccine is developed in the immediate future, the uncertainty will continue to rise in the days and months to come. However, businesses can turn this situation into an opportunity to examine their current operations.

A review of the events of the recent global recession – the global financial crisis of 2007–2008 – reveals that six recession-seeded trends, when acted upon promptly, provided business advantage. Although the trends for the anticipated COVID-19-led recession are still to be established, CIOs can benefit from re-examining the lessons of the past recessions and exploring a recession’s potential to deliver organisational efficiencies and savings. The outcome may be selective adoption of technology or deferral of projects, but the potency of these trends cannot be ignored.

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Conclusion: To respond to the digital world challenges, many organisations are transforming their operations to multi-Cloud to reduce cost, improve service efficiency and contain business risks. As a result, the multi-Cloud availability has become a critical success factor. In some cases, multi-Cloud complex architecture weaknesses have resulted in service outages and allowed ransomware attacks to severely impact business operations. The new generation ITSM tools provide effective backup and recovery facilities that are worth investigation to mitigate multi-Cloud exposures to failure.

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Conclusion: For the last two decades, the market for ruggedised computing has been led by emergency, policing and military needs. The advent of lower-cost wireless networking, 4G and now 5G has prompted a sharp rise in field workers using devices and mobile-ready solutions to streamline operations. Unfortunately, legacy thinking about the type of devices to be used has prevailed: either staff get consumer devices (iOS or Android) or military-spec ruggedised devices.

There is an opportunity to rethink this polarised view of devices. Rather than seeing devices as either consumer or rugged, it is better to view devices on a spectrum of needs, including ruggedness, based on the work contexts in which they will be used.

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Conclusion: Identity and access management is a crucial component of an organisation’s security posture. At its most basic, it is how an organisation determines whether an individual can access resources or not. In today’s world, it is also becoming the basis of how applications first identify then communicate with each other.

Assurance of identity is the cornerstone of managing access to information. An organisation must be confident in that assurance. One method of bolstering the strength of that assurance could be the deployment of multi-factor authentication – at a minimum to privileged users, but ideally to all users of the services and applications whether those users are staff or not.

As organisations move from office-bound networks to distributed workforces combined with Cloud-based Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) applications, identity will evolve to be almost the sole element used to assess and grant access. Identity is certainly a central element of zero trust environments.

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Conclusion: The need to see value from an enterprise architecture (EA) framework is essential, if for no other reason than to justify the cost. However, the business benefit of EA is not just the cost. It will also provide reduced risk and improved agility for the business in its use of ICT.

Many organisations struggle with how success or failure of EA should be measured. This paper provides the reader with guidance and advice on what to measure EA against and how that measurement could be presented as a key performance indicator (KPI).

In establishing KPIs for the EA framework your organisation has adopted, both business and ICT will jointly have a better understanding of the value EA brings to the enterprise, and be able to provide governance on the continuous improvement of your EA framework to achieve even better value.

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IBRSiQ is a database of client inquiries and is designed to get you talking to our advisors about these topics in the context of your organisation in order to provide tailored advice for your needs.

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Conclusion: This month has seen a rise in mid-high level IT management appointments and departures. These types of shifts are especially prominent in times of change and uncertainty when companies search for staff to provide new skills, experiences to support critical IT and business operations. With an impetus to expedite digital transformation and other projects, companies must focus on increased standards for selecting, deploying and managing infrastructure and highly skilled professionals to implement plans. Vendors must be prepared to support customers when leaders with different priorities or focused on streamlining and enhancing business operations are brought in.

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Conclusion: The Digital Ready Workforce Maturity Model serves as a tool to help organisations measure the digital readiness of their workforce. It provides the baseline for organisations. This insight then informs strategic planning, policies and capability development priorities for organisations to guide and subsequently monitor maturity and capability.

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