Conclusion: Workplace change and IT transformation projects typically bring with them more political (organisational) than technical challenges. To win support for these projects concentrate on the people by listening to their concerns and developing strategies to alleviate them. Let the technical solution stand or fall on its own merits.

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Conclusion: Microsoft’s new strategy is to make Windows 10 the dominant enterprise desktop O/S by first winning over the consumers with a much improved user experience, then have consumers demand Windows 10 at work, forcing the enterprise to upgrade. This is Microsoft’s best desktop strategy in 10 years and IT executives must prepare a strategy1 for dealing with user demands or risk losing control of the enterprise desktop strategy.

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Conclusion: Microsoft’s consumer-led strategy for Windows 10 will create ‘pester power’ for the new OS within the enterprise. However, simply upgrading to Windows 10 will re-entrench old assumptions, and continue an out-dated SOE model, yet with no additional business value. An alternative approach is to delay the introduction of Window 10 while a new digital workspaces strategy is developed to transform the business environment. A digital workspace strategy will take time to define and execute, so the CIO must prepare activities to avoid the negative impact of pester-power, while engaging the business in a re-envisioning of the work environment.

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Conclusion: Governance committees face a number of challenges that can undermine their effectiveness. These challenges include groupthink, a focus on individual responsibilities rather than organisation-wide benefits and trust issues. Experienced independent external advisors can play an important role in overcoming these challenges.

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Conclusion: While benefits management is considered highly relevant to project challenges facing organisations, benefits management has proven difficult to fit into the way that the organisation undertakes projects. The potential of effective benefits management is understood, but the ability of organisations to apply it continues to lag.

Implementing a pragmatic approach which considers the culture and relative maturity of the organisation will assist in improving this key area of IT investment governance.

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Conclusion: Today’s Windows centric desktop is based on 20 year old assumptions about devices and applications and is the result of years of sustained innovation. We are now at the point in the desktop innovation cycle where incremental change no longer adds business value and the business is reluctant to fund upgrades. This was clearly demonstrated by the difficulty most IT organisations had funding their Windows XP upgrade.

Forward-thinking CIOs are reassessing the assumptions on which their next end user computing platform will be built and are experimenting with disruptive innovations to build a self-service, web-centric Digital Workspace that will last the next 10-15 years.

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Conclusion: One IT-as-a-Service strategy remains to migrate legacy systems to SaaS to reduce cost, improve service level and achieve excellence in end user experience. However, large-scale ERP SaaS migrations are still not imminent, primarily due to the significant ERP customisation made by Australian organisations during the last twenty years, which prevent the use of standard SaaS architecture without re-engineering the business processes. However, it is worth noting that there are third party ERP maintenance and support services, which used in the short term may result in up-to 50 % reduction in the current yearly maintenance and support cost.

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Conclusion: Businesses with an interest in becoming ‘digitally transformed’ need to take stock of their current status and preparedness. Systematic as well as creative approaches can be taken to discover ways to radically upgrade the business’ operations as shown in a self-assessment.

Use this checklist showing five stages of maturity in preparing for a digitally based transformation of the business.

Take the necessary actions in a graduated approach to make the required transitions endure.

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Conclusion: Security leaders know that it is not enough for the security group to do its job; they must be seen to be doing their job. This need for communication between security and the business is resulting in organisations creating outreach roles. Many organisations have yet to realise that this communications gap directly impacts their risk management capabilities. While the security team may be executing its work with technical accuracy, it is not serving the true needs of the business. The key to bridging this gap is an outreach function.

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Conclusion: In order to develop an IT transformation program it is important to understand today’s operational and workplace context and use the insights gained to shape the way change can be achieved with a minimum of risk.

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Conclusion: There are almost no examples of traditional organisations metamorphosing their physical products (and related business models) into digital products (supported by new business models). On the other hand the list of organisations that have gone out of business as a result of the digital revolution continues to grow. Three characteristics are common to non-digital organisations that have lost out to digital competitors.

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Conclusion: The full financial maturity model provides more detail which can be applied to organisational requirements.

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Conclusion: This month has seen a number of large and high value outsourcing agreements. The Manchester United/Epson contract renewal was especially interesting and indicative of increased flexibility when vendors and buyers establish outsourcing agreements. Epson will continue to provide IT infrastructure and obtain advertising rights from Manchester United in a combined sponsorship/managed services agreement, established in 2010. These types of outcome-based, business-focused agreements which provide unique benefits to both parties can result in stronger relationship foundations, transparency, and a greater chance of success during the course of an arrangement and when resolving difficulties that may arise.

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Conclusion: Prominent this month are a wide range of new projects and service offerings in the IT outsourcing industry. This growth has highlighted the necessity for flexible environments and models that can adapt to changing requirements and company demands. Recent announcements by outsourcing vendors CSC and HP to divide their operations indicates increased flexibility is required beyond not only new product models, but also business models and corporate structures. HP was founded in 1939, and CSC in 1959, with current restructures aimed at enhancing efficiency and services provided.

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Conclusion: Poor planning is frequently cited in surveys as a major reason an ICT project has failed. A major element in the planning process is the preparation of the business case setting out why the project is needed and must be approved.

Management is remiss when it approves a poorly developed business case as it sends the wrong message to developers and sponsors – that if the project fails to deliver they are not to blame.

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Conclusion: Proficiency in financial analysis and concepts is critical for management. Assessment of an organisation’s skills establishes the requirements necessary to raise abilities. The financial maturity model can assist with the process of setting those requirements.

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Conclusion: Big data and analytics projects can learn important lessons from the domain of information security analytics platforms. Two critical factors to consider when planning deployment of an analytics platform are: the need for a clear business objective and; the depth and duration of organisational commitment required. Without a clear understanding of the objective of the analytics project, or adequate resource commitment, the project will likely fail to deliver on expectations. The worst outcome is that inadequate investment in people could result in an organisation drawing incorrect conclusions from the analytics platform.

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Conclusion: Based on usage patterns and personalisation MCPs (Smartphones and Tablets) offer an opportunity to build a more intimate relationship with customers. While there is great opportunity there are some technology and cultural challenges that need to be addressed.

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Conclusion: The Workspace of the Future is a vision statement on how staff and stakeholders will perform tasks related to their work in the next decade. It includes technological innovation (e. g. mobility, Cloud, data analytics), organisation transformation (e. g. activity-based working) and cultural change (e. g. social, collaboration). To realise this vision, especially given its all-encompassing and potentially transformational impact, requires a strategy that is specifically crafted to fit with an organisation’s long-term objectives. Part of this strategy is a complete rethink of end user computing, by challenging desktop era assumptions.

However, challenging assumptions is difficult. To gain clarity, IBRS recommends mapping assumptions to principles and business impacts. By conducting an assumption mapping exercise, organisations may begin to not only communicate the need for change within both IT and business groups but, also, uncover potential for fundamental business transformation.

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Conclusion: With the local availability of VMware’s Infrastructure as a Service (vCloud Air), all Australian VMware customers should consider it for self-service dev/test environments, virtual desktops, and more importantly DR as a Service (DRaaS). Savvy CIOs will use low risk, low cost practical experiments to develop in-house skills and experience while delivering new capabilities to the business that leads to real adoption of IaaS over the next 18 months.

The risk to CIOs who do not start adopting IaaS is that IT staff and/or business units embark on their own projects in an uncontrolled fashion leading to IT fragmentation and loss of control over the IT strategy.

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Conclusion: Nearly all organisations recognise that the world, their industry, and their customers are changing. Evidence of that realisation can be seen in company restructures, strategy and vision documents, and the discourse used by executive management. Change vocabulary such as transformation, innovation, anything Cloud, as-a-service or mobile is widely used. However, history shows that even highly successful companies find change and transformation difficult, with icons such as Novell and Netscape either failing completely or being relegated to market followers.

Review of these and similar organisations shows that being overly committed to a previously winning formula, misreading the market and competition dynamics or responding to market changes too slowly were common missteps.

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Conclusion: Digital disruption is now a given in every industry vertical, although each is impacted in its own distinctive ways.

The drivers for connecting everything and transforming business are the desires for improving corporate agility and personal productivity. The use of utility information and communications technologies (ICT) such as Cloud and Mobility is proving to be a key enabler of Digital Transformation for any size of private or public sector business in any sector.

Transformation, agility and productivity are coming from hyper-connected people and processes.

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Conclusion: IT organisations adopting IT-as-a-Service strategies tend to acquire the best of breed services from the market instead of building them in-house. This leads to increased adoption of multi-sourced services, whereby reliable governance processes are critical success factors to realise the desired business benefits in a timely and cost-effective manner.

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Conclusion: especially interesting this month was Datacom’s and the Department of Health’s infrastructure and support services agreement. In particular the service provision model which is outcomes-based with a consumption-based pricing model. These types of agreements highlight the demand for arrangements which are more transparent in order to reduce conflict, align interests, and increase contract flexibility to adapt to changes in customer needs or vendor capacities. By establishing stronger and clearer foundations, customers and vendors are more likely to have a sustainable and successful outsourcing agreement.

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Conclusion: organisations have invested considerable resources over the past decade in an effort to improve their procurement capability. ICT investments were often large, complicated, and undertaken over long periods. Companies expressed concerns that they felt vulnerable when dealing with technology vendors, and their relationships often reflected protectionist behaviour. Cloud based services and other consumerisation of ICT procurement places pressure on technology companies to perform, as their customers can theoretically switch quickly and relatively painlessly if they are unhappy with products and/or services. However, organisations will need to be smart buyers to optimise the benefits of the new services on offer, but also be good customers.

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Conclusion: the Department of Finance has produced a Cloud Policy that is linked to a paper about Cloud implementation that does not mention modern Cloud architecture, which in turn is linked to an architecture paper that does not mention Cloud.

Agencies looking to adopt Cloud services are advised to look for advice beyond the Australian Government’s Cloud Policy and its supporting documents.

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Conclusion: Lockheed Martin’s Cyber Kill Chain framework is a potentially valuable perspective for highly risk averse and highly targeted organisations. Its language is militaristic and technical, which means that it is most suitable for people already inclined to that way of thinking, but in contrast, it may be inappropriate and ineffective with other audiences. Due to its militaristic language, the policy intentions of this framework may be (and have been) reinterpreted by stakeholders, resulting in a misalignment of effort in managing risks.

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Conclusion: moving to an activity based working (ABW) environment is a complex multifactor project. Organisations can take stock of their readiness to approach activity based working by using the maturity model. The model will assist in developing the planning criteria required for any ABW strategy.

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Conclusion: in the publication ‘Running-IT-as-a-Service part 4’, IBRS defined how Service Value Agreements can be constructed by correlating business performance metrics with IT service levels. This note describes how Service Value Agreements can be constructed by aligning IT service levels with business service levels and processes. As a result, meeting or exceeding SLA targets will demonstrate the IT organisation’s contribution to business performance improvement and cost reduction undertakings.

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Conclusion: leading Mobile Device Management (MDM) solution providers will persist but face multiple challenges with Microsoft’s Enterprise Mobility Suite, especially its Intune Configuration, rising as a logical challenge to MDM in >50% of Australian enterprises before 2017.

The dominant MDM selection criterion will remain: how well does this mobility solution integrate with Microsoft and others?

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Conclusion: organisations planning to move to Microsoft Cloud-based Office 365 should first examine and segment their workforce to identify the most appropriate mix of Office 365 editions (which Microsoft calls SKUs) for staff, and then examine Microsoft’s various licensing options. Organisations with existing enterprise agreements need to be particularly careful with the latter, not so much to avoid compliance issues, but rather to minimise spend.

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Related Articles:

"The journey of Office 365: A guiding framework Part 3: Post-implementation" IBRS, 2016-05-05 00:21:00

"The journey to Office 365: A guiding framework Part 1" IBRS, 2016-03-01 04:23:10

"The journey to Office 365: A guiding framework Part 2 migration" IBRS, 2016-04-01 04:43:19

"The journey to Office 365: Part 4 – Skills" IBRS, 2016-06-02 00:26:00

Conclusion: the adoption of Cloud-based applications and data, the proliferation of mobile devices (i.e. Smartphones and Tablets) and the increased interest in BYOD is driving a radical change in end user computing. The old device-centric model, based on a stateful Windows desktop, is being replaced by an application-centric model where device state is transient. While this is not yet the end of the Windows desktop, the beginning of the end has arrived.

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Conclusion: CIOs and the IT management team continually wrestle with prioritising and coordinating planned and unplanned IT operational changes for both new and existing systems. The problem is compounded when senior managers use informal influence with IT staff to change the priorities, thereby jumping the queue and bypassing formal processes. Not only does this create disharmony, it can also cause system failures.

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Conclusion: the key factor in the selection of a CRM vendor should be the duration in which the product will be in service. The time in service period could be up to a seven year horizon and therefore durability is a critical condition in order to make a selection. This recommendation counts equally for vendor abilities as it does for an organisation’s requirements.

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Conclusion: travelling executives must be under no illusion that if corporate information on, or accessible via, their electronic devices is of interest to the economic wellbeing of a foreign country, they will be targeted for electronic intrusion. The potential value of the information to a third party will be directly proportional to the effort they may expend in getting it. The more an organisation has at stake, the more important it is that this is a risk-driven conversation, not a technology one, because the technology does not matter if an executive’s behaviour does not alter to match the risk.

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Conclusion: email and basic collaboration services have reached a point where Cloud-based solutions deliver features, quality of service and reliability at price points that cannot be met by the vast majority of in-house IT groups. The question is not should an organisation move its email and basic collaborations services to the Cloud, or even when an organisation should move to the Cloud, but what additional collaboration services will move to the Cloud at the same time.

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Conclusion: discussions regarding innovation in the ICT industry have been prominent this month, with a focus on investment in new technologies and collaborative arrangements for further development to support managed ICT services. With a dynamic and continuously evolving services landscape, there is a clear need to differentiate offerings, as well as innovate to support new service models, technologies, and changing customer demands. Flexibility is critical if vendors are to provide solutions that support the needs of its customers and the market. By combining knowledge, expertise, access to resources as well as products and services, businesses in disparate industries are providing tailored and alternative solutions to cater to market demands that are emerging at a fast rate.

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Conclusion: failure to maintain a competent ERP support group1 can have an adverse impact on an organisation’s business operations. When the group lacks the resources to keep the software current or to resolve data errors in rejected transactions, clients become disillusioned with the ERP and either work around its requirements or develop alternate systems solutions, e. g. using spreadsheets or departmental computing.

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Conclusion: organisations moving traditional enterprise applications into production on AWS will find backup and recovery functional but immature compared to their existing on-premises Enterprise Backup and Recovery (EBR) tools.

Storage administrators need to understand the native backup and recovery methods in AWS and determine how these can be used to meet the business’ recovery objectives. The optimal AWS solution may require adopting new tools and rethinking long-held assumptions.

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Conclusion: when managing both client server (legacy) and Anything-as-a-Service (XaaS) environment it is important the legacy environment does not constrain the potentially superior XaaS environment.

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