Conclusion: Progressing digital transformation strategies requires a much more holistic view of service delivery and extends beyond existing business process review and business systems improvement. Designing services that support digital transformation objectives need to look at the end to end service including customer experience. Traditional business analysis activities that captured the requirements of the business process owner and are used to implement business systems will not be adequate.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Traditional on-premises approaches to infrastructure can create unnecessary costs, risks and bottlenecks. This is particularly a problem for projects delivering new systems that have a high-risk (i. e., uncertain benefits, functionality, capacity) which are often associated with innovation and digital strategies.

IT organisations should look at alternative methods for delivering IT infrastructure to ensure it is not a barrier to business innovation.

Read more ...

Conclusion: IT organisations should not be treating software releases to support the digital transformation as “business as usual”, because they may overlook the demand for extra-company IT management process integration, rapid application deployment, and speedy problem resolution. IT organisations should recreate their “release to production” processes to address the new applications’ unique requirements for appropriate security, resilient architecture, and elevated service level standards.

Read more ...

This Compass expands upon the initial discussion presented in the IBRS Master Advisory Presentation, “Digital Workspaces: Enabling the Future Workplace.”1It outlines IBRS Workspaces Strategy Framework that can guide the development of your end user computing strategy that embraces evolving work practices, such as mobility, activity based working, and self-service.

Read more ...

In June 2015, the then Minister for Communications, Malcolm Turnbull, introduced a report based on CEDA research titled ‘Australia’s future workforce’. The report examined the impact of the next wave of digital disruption on business activity, how automation will eliminate many of today’s current work roles and the impact of digital disruption on existing business practices.

Based on the previous industrial revolution, workers moved to metropolitan areas to gain employment. This model meant that physical proximity to a workplace was the key defining factor to both the worker seeking employment and the organisation seeking skilled and unskilled workers.

However, the CEDA report highlights that many of the current roles undertaken today — up to five million of them — will either disappear or be changed significantly by 2020. Significant automation will replace many manual and predictable activities, including accounting and even roles in the health sector. To date there has been action to adapt to the coming change in technology organisations and private companies; however, there is still significant lag in the public sector

Full Story

Conclusion: This month, discussions regarding analytics and data-driven innovation have been prominent. As the role of IT changes from providing technology solutions to driving business outcomes and strategy through the use of technology agile services to support business processes and targets are required. Companies have recognised that data handling and having the capacity to absorb, use and deliver data are becoming core competencies. This has prompted the growth of service providers that manage and analyse data, as well as providing associated services such as security and storage.

Read more ...

Conclusion: To achieve workplace assimilation of new or replacement business systems, staff must be well trained and convinced it is in their best interests to become proficient operatives. For assimilation to become a reality a comprehensive workplace change management program, that includes a systems training strategy, must be developed.

Read more ...

Conclusion: The standard method to assess the future is through the type and function of technologies. The starting point is the way new technologies modify processes and thereby rebalance requirements and outputs. An alternative approach is to examine how executive management will adapt to technological innovation because management maintains longstanding principles and objectives which are noteworthy in the implementation of technologies.

Read more ...

Conclusion: The challenge with handling threat intelligence is in assessing its relevance to an organisation, determining an appropriate response and then continual execution and reassessment. Consequently, the more comprehensive the threat intelligence service is, the greater the requirement for a customer to have existing, mature cyber security capability. Organisations must understand how they will use a threat intelligence service and what business benefit it will deliver to their organisation.

Read more ...

Conclusion: The fragmented uptake of real-time co-authoring will disrupt current business practices and impact a number of core information technology solutions as it changes how some types of knowledge are created and how people organise to accomplish some types of work. It is imperative the CIO/CDO engage business strategists, those involved with workplace innovation, and human resources executives to discuss the opportunities and impact of real-time co-authoring, and develop policies and cultural change plans to minimise the risks and disruptions, while also taking advantage of the opportunities.

Read more ...

Related Articles:

"Get ready for Real-Time Co-Authoring: Part 1" IBRS, 2015-11-02 02:59:07

Conclusion: IT organisations establishing business relationship management to excel at coordinating business and IT strategic matters should assess the current maturity of this role. The rationale is to allow IT to deliver solutions that improve business performance, reduce the cost of doing business and mitigate business risks.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Industry discussion regarding Cloud based IT business models, have found it easy to claim a level of expertise simply by publishing high level observations and unsubstantiated predictions. Unfortunately, while interesting, these observations and predictions have offered little assistance to IT executives looking to design a future IT service based on Cloud. Should an IT executive choose to change their business model, there has been little or no advice on how to proceed.

Several CIOs have expressed concern that research advocating downsizing is negatively impacting their credibility. Faced with a plethora of information and recommendations, many will struggle to maintain ongoing financial and cultural support from within their own organisations.

Read more ...

Conclusion: To progress digital transformation strategies there are a number of new competencies (such as problem finding and problem framing) that organisations need to recognise and master or partner with specialists to ensure that investments and efforts are aimed at solving the right problems. CIOs and business executives will need to assess the problem finding capabilities within their organisations or risk implementing a better digital solution to a problem that is no longer relevant.

Read more ...

This Compass is a companion document to IBRS’ Master Advisory Presentation (MAP) “Delivering Digital Business Transformation” which outlines business and management issues and provides guidance on delivering an effective digital business transformation.

Read more ...

Workspaces: At the next desktop upgrade an organisation has two options: It can incrementally improve the desktop, using 20-year-old assumptions, or create a new end user computing platform based on modern technology trends. In this IBRS master advisory presentation (MAP), IBRS outlines the high-level issues surrounding the future of the Digital Workspace from both a business and technology viewpoint.

This MAP is designed to guide and stimulate discussion between business and technology groups, and point the way for more detailed activity. It also provides links to further reading to support these follow-up activities.

Read more ...

Conclusion: To grow their business and deliver sought after online services, organisations must provide error free systems supported by robust IT infrastructure. When unable to deliver one or both of these consumers will seek other suppliers that provide better online services.

To meet consumer expectations online systems must be comprehensively tested and error free before making them publicly available, and operated on IT infrastructure that can be ramped-up when needed to meet consumer demands. The inability to provide quality services when required could put the organisation’s reputation at risk.

Read more ...

Conclusion: The IT industry has hit a breaking point where the artificial grouping of information security and IT has left many organisations vulnerable. Business units have viewed information security as an IT problem, and IT has abdicated responsibility for many aspects of operations that should be viewed as basic hygiene. It is time for organisations that want to establish a reputation of trust with their stakeholders, to view information security very differently. This will require IT to take on more responsibility for security hygiene issues, and for many security practitioners to make the mental shift from technical do-ers to risk communicators. All organisations must know who, internally, is ultimately accountable for cyber-security and that this person is adequately informed, and empowered to execute on this accountability.

Read more ...

Conclusion: The new digital business model for IT is based on selecting, composing, and leveraging a dynamic range of Cloud based external services. Under the new IT paradigm people will work the way they want, when and where they want and with all the tools with which they are familiar; collaborate using a wide range of low-cost commodity services; and use their own devices (and in some cases their own applications) while those responsible for information governance seamlessly maintain control over the organisation’s enterprise information, privacy and security.

Read more ...

Conclusion: In this note, IBRS defines real-time co-authoring, and outlines the factors hindering its adoption. Real-time co-authoring has been available for almost a decade via products such as Google Apps, and in the past few years, web-based Microsoft Office 365. However, the uptake of this capability has been lacklustre due to immature collaboration environments and, more significantly, deeply held preconceptions about the nature of documents and work.

The introduction of real-time co-authoring in the Microsoft Office 2016 (Word) desktop client removes some barriers to the end user adoption of real-time co-authoring. However, it does not directly address the cultural aspects that hinder adoption. Even so, organisations should expect the use of real-time co-authoring to rise, but in a fragmented, infectious manner.

Read more ...

Related Articles:

"Real-Time Co-Authoring Part 2" IBRS, 2015-12-02 20:08:00

Conclusion: The Service Catalogue required by the ITIL framework has undergone several variations during the last 20 years. The rationale was to address the emerging service trends in in-house and outsourced modes of operations. However, while the original service catalogues’ objectives were achieved, they are inadequate in acquiring hybrid Cloud core services (e. g. storage) that should be delivered under outcome-based service contracts.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Business leaders who have concluded that a Chief Digital Officer is required to provide a critical focus on their digital transformation plans, will find that defining the role in detail will remain an ongoing challenge because it is intensely context-sensitive.

Consequently, the first iteration of a Chief Digital Officer’s (CDO) role responsibilities, job description and person specification needs to be widely canvassed and tolerant of the ambiguity between maintaining ‘business as usual’ and a digital transformation.

A CDO role action plan is an important first step in setting and clarifying expectations.

Read more ...

Conclusion: The term ‘digital disruption’ exerts a powerful cocktail of possibilities. While the term has limited application in specific cases, its general use has diluted its meaning. Whether this is significant may be judged individually but the general use of digital disruption to any and all events coinciding with the introduction of new technologies is misleading.

For the most part executives and strategists can understand technologies and their implementation as progressive evolution. This is especially true for buyers of technology. For some technology vendors and industries the effect of digital technologies may be disruptive, even destructive, insofar as markets, capital and stock value are lost.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Australian Organisations are actively developing and refining digital transformation strategies in recognition of the changing business and government operational environment. Innovation is generously mentioned in most strategies and there has been an increase in the number of Chief Digital Officer roles being offered and filled to assist organisations to achieve the transformation they are striving for. However, organisations need to actively develop innovation and entrepreneurial skills and capabilities across their organisations to ensure that they have broad skills to contribute to transformation and innovation programs and an entrepreneurial culture to support ongoing experimentation and change.

Read more ...

Conclusion: This month, Fujitsu and Link Group announced a five year extension to their current ten year managed services agreement, which is founded on a combined on-site, on-shore and offshore delivery model for the provision of a variety of services. This is indicative of an increase in further alignment between IT spending and business strategic priorities utilising complex and evolving delivery models. The agreement highlights the need to provide a wide range of resources which cater to business needs, whilst managing them as one. In order to do this, a cohesive management strategy and the capacity to accommodate increased IT proliferation, new technologies, and associated security risks, must be carefully integrated into outsourcing plans during vendor engagement and contract performance. 

Read more ...

Conclusion: Many business leaders around the world have concluded that although information and communications technologies (ICT) are mature, their own business has yet to systematically address digital transformation as an opportunity and a Digital Officer is required to provide that focus. ‘Business-as-Usual’ is an increasingly rejected approach.

A Chief Digital Officer (CDO) or similar appointment with broad responsibilities is clearly needed to deliver radical digital transformation in large or complex enterprises.

Read more ...

Conclusion: There are two compelling information security reasons for creating a sense of purpose and ownership within an organisation. The first is that a sense of purpose and ownership will empower staff so that they move from responding to basic security hygiene matters, towards pre-empting issues. The second reason is so that organisations look out beyond themselves and work towards a more resilient ecosystem.

This level of resilience maturity is vital and will be driven by leadership and a continuing commitment to talent development. Astute security leaders will use cultural indicators such as engagement and sense of purpose and ownership, as a guide to the ability of the organisation to withstand security incidents.

Read more ...

Conclusion: The return on investment in big data and associated analytics projects has been generally positive. It is more likely that returns over the longer term will grow too, provided strategic aims are established. The promise of big data hinges on information analysis, and therefore organisations must be clear as to use and application of the insight.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Unless the Executive holds business and IT management accountable for reporting if the benefits expected in the business case have been realised or not, they will never know whether they made the right decision to invest in the first place.

To estimate the gross benefits and costs, it is imperative the business case records not only the performance metrics when it was approved, but also those current when the business system(s), was implemented (when there is a time lag).

Read more ...

Conclusion: The days of viewing BI as a single solution are over. Organisations should view Business Intelligence as four distinct, but interlocking services that each addresses a different critical business imperative: reporting; self-direct data exploration; operational decision support; and data science. Each of these imperatives addresses different stakeholders and will have its own architect.

Read more ...

Conclusion: To improve the digital maturity of an organisation the CIO must encourage a team effort from business and technical areas within their organisation as well as strategic partners in the IT industry. Laggard IT vendors should be dropped in favour of digital leaders. The CIO will also need to convince their organisation to make early investments in long term capabilities that are critical to the adoption of new digital initiatives.

Read more ...

Conclusion: It has been well established in recent reports that future workplaces will be significantly different from today and the workers of tomorrow will demand to work differently. Technology has enabled organisations to provide greater freedom to their workers with a new, greater understanding of the strength and weaknesses of flexible working. In addition, organisations will gradually casualise their workforce for greater flexibility. Organisations that fully harness the potential of providing highly flexible or flexible and creative workplaces early will be able to attract and retain the best talent for their workforce. Other organisations will be forced to adapt as work roles and practices disappear or change radically.

Read more ...

Conclusion: To ensure desktop investments are aligned to the organisation’s strategy, and the business benefits are clearly understood, IT organisations should create a Benefit Dependency Network. This is a benefits management tool that explicitly shows the linkages between technology investments and the business benefits, uncovers the business changes necessary to deliver these benefits, and clarifies the role of the business in harvesting those benefits.

Through the processes of building a Benefit Dependency Network, the IT organisation can engage the business in a meaningful discussion about business benefits and about the business changes needed to harvest them. Without a benefits analysis a major desktop investment is less likely to be approved and there are risks generating no value for the business, perpetuating the view that IT is a cost that must be reduced.

Read more ...

Conclusion: This month there has been an especially visible increase in managed service provider offerings and expansion globally. With the wide range and increased release speed of new technologies in the market, greater emphasis has been placed on adopting new technologies in business to support evolution and cost reduction. Approximately 70% of business leaders involved in company digital business transformation ranked new technology adoption as the top priority in a survey this month, resulting in an increased demand for tailored solutions with effective implementations in complex ICT environments.

Read more ...

Many IT organisations are trying to change their perceived image from high-cost / low quality to value-added service providers. However, many of the adopted approaches revolve around improving just few processes (e.g. problem management). While these processes are important, they are insufficient to produce the desired effect for IT groups to deliver value-added services. 

In this IBRS Master Advisory Presentation (MAP), IBRS outlines the high-level issues, surrounding Running IT as a Service from both business and technology viewpoints.This MAP is designed to guide and stimulate discussions between business and technology groups and point the way for more detailed activity. It also provides links to further reading to support these follow-up activities.

The MAP is provided as a set of presentation slides,  and as a script and executive briefing document.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Especially interesting this month was a Trial Services Agreements (TSA) between SkyFii and Wests Ashfield Leagues Club. The agreement spans four weeks, with very specific deliverables and KPIs. In IT outsourcing, where agreements and relationships can become difficult to manage or collapse due to a wide range of unforeseen complexities, TSAs are emerging as a solid review process to measure vendor skills and capacity to service specific customers. These TSAs are also an attractive avenue for vendors to display competencies sought by customers and a precursor to possible long-term relationships. Such arrangements can also provide a greater clarity when setting terms and establishing final agreements as well as clearer and sturdier ongoing vendor/customer relations.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Non-IT executives are often reported as being concerned about the prospect of a cyber incident, but as security is not their area of expertise, responsibility for mitigation and preparation is often devolved to IT. This is a mistake, because as much as lack of any security could be devastating, applying the wrong controls to an organisation can be equally debilitating. Security is a response to risk, and it is the ongoing mandate of executives to demonstrate that they are guiding their organisation through foreseeable risks. Consequently, many organisations would benefit from the appointment of an information security officer who is able to translate between IT and the business and ensure that cyber risks are prepared for responsibly.

Read more ...

Conclusion: The Australian market presents serious problems to marketers. The situation has been foreseeable for the last two years. The situation is likely to soften further, which will constrain their capacity to seek growth.

Solutions are available and require reappraisal of strategies and objectives. Applying intelligence and the right tools should help organisations steer through the variety of conditions ahead.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Sustained investment in IT Infrastructure is critical for the delivery of services to clients and delivering business efficiencies. Without continued investment service quality will deteriorate, operational incidents occur more frequently and the organisation’s network put at risk from unwanted intrusions.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Most organisations have some form of central approval process (Governance) based around agreed artefacts – few organisations have a built-in evergreening process to ensure governance controls are in line with emerging technology and business trends.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Despite the prominence of Business Process Management (BPM) in most organisations, Enterprise Architects are routinely oblivious to the scope for using Communications-Enabled Business Process (CEBP) within their BPM.

The very large global Microsoft and Google developer communities have run with the most popular collaboration suites as a foundation for their CEBP apps.

The most common CEBP solutions are based on customised messaging allowing alerts, alarms and notifications to be used to support business process. Widespread use of customised ‘Presence’ has become particularly helpful in giving the status of people or resources to inform transactions. Human delay and business latency is being minimised by using notifications to handle routine processes as well as exceptions to business rules.

Read more ...

Subscribe

Want to get the latest papers from all our advisors? Subscribe, and we'll send you the information you need.

Invalid Input
Please enter a valid email address
Invalid Input
Please enter your mobile phone number
Invalid Input