Organisations migrating to the Cloud and embracing flexible user-based computing have been tied up in knots with Microsoft’s archaic licensing models. On the end user computing side of things, a quick review of my notes on the nuances of Virtual Desktop Access (VDA) licensing and Remote Desktop Services (RDS) licensing are enough to give most people a brain aneurism.

Read more ...

This month, the Lufthansa/IBM infrastructure outsourcing agreement, valued at $1.25B was particularly significant. These “big bang” outsourcing agreements have pared back the past few years because of difficulties associated with long-term contracts, such as vendor lock-in and expense, especially when project objectives are not met and client/vendor disagreements arise. 

Read more ...

Conclusion: Organisations across Australia are talking about innovation. Having a structured approach for idea management within organisations is critical as is receiving executive support and appropriate funding for new ideas. However, thinking differently about problems and opportunities will be a key competency in the drive for innovation. One approach such as design thinking is being utilised to great effect in other countries. There are some local occurrences but Australia is lagging and needs to take action to catch up.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Productivity is one of management’s major objectives. This is generally understood but not always executed. As an enabler of organisational functions and productivity, IT needs a precise understanding of the concept in order to fulfil organisational productivity.

Read more ...

Conclusion: When considering using cyber-insurance to deal with the potential costs associated with a successful attack, there are important considerations that CIOs and CISOs should be highlighting to operational risk and finance executives. Most organisations will need to raise their risk maturity substantially, and this means investment as well as changes to practices, before they are in a position to be able to take advantage of cyber-insurance.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Failure to understand the nuances present in clinical environments can lead to experienced ICT professionals making fundamental errors. These errors can impact patient safety.

Read more ...

Related Articles:

"Why Health ICT is failing Patients" IBRS, 2014-10-31 18:11:44

Conclusion: Organisations that have made a move to Google in an effort to reduce their reliance on the incumbent Microsoft Office Suite have found that migrating from Microsoft involves far more than just human change management. Technological linkages with the Office desktop client(s) hold back organisations’ transfer to the Cloud. Before implementing Cloud-based productivity tools, an organisation should examine just how ‘sticky’ Microsoft Office is within their organisation, and should plan on how to become ‘unstuck’.

Read more ...

Conclusion: IT managers who discourage staff from using consumer oriented technologies could be doing themselves a disservice. Whilst there are risks of data leakage or cost blowouts from over-usage of external computing resources, the unexpected benefits such as identifying new patterns of buying behaviour or using data analysis to identify welfare fraud, far outweigh management’s concerns.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Before embarking on a virtual desktop project examine the major factors in delivering a virtual desktop rather than immediately focusing on a technical evaluation of Citrix vs. VMware. This should include use cases, service model (i. e., Cloud, Managed Service Provider or Build, Own, Run) and infrastructure model (i. e., Desktop-as-a-service, Engineered System, Do It Yourself).

Read more ...

Conclusion: To reduce Service Desk costs and improve resources scheduling, some IT organisations are exploring the potential of Virtual Service Desk Agents to either improve self-service and/or reach to the right subject matter expert at the right time. However self-service success depends on the quality of information available to the virtual agents. It is critical for the virtual agent tool to be enabled by a mature service management engine that describes the service’s known errors and their resolution alternatives. Failure to do so will leave the virtual agent with no alternative but to call the live agents, thereby making the investment in virtual agent technology questionable.

Read more ...

Conclusion: The popularity and growth of online social media platforms has pushed social data into the spotlight. Humans using the Web mainly interact with human-produced data. Yet the floods of machine-generated data that flow through the Internet remain invisible to humans. For a number of reasons attempts by organisations to mine big social data to improve marketing and to increase sales will fall significantly short of expectations. Data from digital devices and sensor networks that are part of the Internet of Things is eclipsing human produced data. Machines have replaced humans as the most social species on the planet, and this must inform the approach to data science and the development of healthy economic ecosystems.

Read more ...

While hyper-scale vendors have been a little slow in opening data centres in the Australian market, the anecdotal evidence is the take-up is very strong:

Read more ...

October has been a great month for ICT outsourcing contracts, with a wide range of agreement types, vendors and buyers representing different industries.  Particularly interesting is the high number of smaller providers establishing a real presence in the market.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Virtual teams continue to be an accepted organisation mode as a means of grouping specialist and project resources together to achieve high quality outcomes. Recent research1 identifies that more than 40% or Fortune 500 companies currently utilise virtual teaming. Smaller organisations have found that technology tools provide the mechanisms to collaborative cost effectively. A key activity of virtual teams is collaborating on research, projects and reports. Understanding the purpose of the collaborative authoring activity, the personality preferences of the authors and the relationship of the authors can enable organisations to increase the quality of the output with less effort and in less elapsed time.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Financial models provide insights and support better understanding. Using the right model depends on a thorough knowledge of its output and what it means. A powerful and valid model must have currency outside IT.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Over the years, many ICT professionals have moved from roles in commerce to roles in Health without recognising the unique challenges presented by clinical environments. The result is an underperforming, expensive and misaligned ICT service that soaks up hundreds of millions of dollars annually for minimal patient benefit.

Read more ...

Related Articles:

"Why Health ICT is failing Patients (Part 2)" IBRS, 2014-12-03 16:44:03

Conclusion: When implementing enterprise Cloud services, a disciplined and locally distributed approach to user acceptance testing in combination with real-time dashboards for test management and defect management can be used as the centrepiece of a highly scalable quality assurance framework. An effective quality assurance process can go a long way to minimise risks, and to ensure a timely and successful rollout.

Read more ...

Conclusion: There are a number of traits and behaviours to look for in an effective security leader, which are different from a traditional IT leader. The measure of an effective CISO is not whether their organisation has had a breach, or not. The measures of an effective CISO are the types of incidents their organisation has, and how their organisation responds to these. Consequently, an effective CISO is a requisite component for comprehensive risk management and organisational resilience.

Read more ...

Conclusion: IT organisations developing IT policies in isolation from business units1 will face challenges to tie policies to business drivers and limit policies acceptance rate. IT organisations should formulate policies by involving business units at an early stage in policy scope discussion. IT best practices2 should be leveraged to develop reliable and practical policies. The resources needed to develop the new policies should come from both sides and a business benefits realisation plan should jointly be developed and tracked.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Determining the optimum licensing mix involves not only an understanding of Software Assurance, but also consultation with the organisation’s business strategy groups, as well as a firm understanding of potential structural changes, such as mergers, de-mergers, acquisitions, and growth strategies. Getting the wrong mix can result in overspend, or worse, an inability to adopt business strategies such as mobility, activity based working, or bring-your-own-device.

Read more ...

Related Articles:

"Understanding and Optimising Microsoft Software Assurance: Part 1 – The Basics" IBRS, 2014-10-01 20:28:23

Conclusion: While the concept of bundling and outsourcing of IT services is simple, its pricing regime based on dedicated devices available and not client applications processed, frustrates efforts to make IT costs transparent to business managers.

Read more ...

Conclusion: HP’s split into two companies is more important as a sign of the dramatic changes in the IT infrastructure market than the impact it will have on HP customers. When combined with IBM’s exit from the PC and x86 markets and Dell going private, poor financial results from leaders such as IBM and SAP, it is clear we are in the midst of a major industry transition that is being driven by the forces of Social, Mobile, Analytics, Cloud and Consumerisation (SMACC).

Read more ...

Software Asset Management tools vendors have been spreading the FUD (fear, uncertainty, doubt) as thick and as fast as they can. It’s not that they’re wrong in their claims of the risks. It’s just that mitigating these risks is not a matter of technology. SAM is a matter of process. It’s a matter of maturity. And here lies a problem with how software asset management is currently being positioned in Australia.

Read more ...

New service contract agreements have been prominent the past month, particularly with the Department of Defence. The Department of Defence has traditionally engaged in high volume, high value, complex projects and does invest a lot in IT to support its critical functions.

Read more ...

Conclusion: With increasing pressure to digitise extra services to clients, now is the time to review the effectiveness of the partnership between IT and business units. Unless it is strong the capacity to deliver the extra services will be at risk.

Read more ...

Conclusion: There are several established models which have been used to evaluate technology investments. Some models are applied to assess the value of technology in use within an organisation.

Organisations can select a model for a particular need; however it is fundamental that the assumptions and the factors that construct the model are realistic and clearly understood. Furthermore, the models should be comprehended by other departments within an organisation, such as finance. A model that is only applied within, and solely has merit for IT is generally not an altogether useful tool. The outputs and the inferences drawn from these outputs may not convince other parties if the tool is not compatible to cross-department interpretation.

Read more ...

Conclusion: The development of new digital services often entails not only changes to workflows but also changes to the business rules that must be enforced by software. Whilst vendors of business rule engine technology often market their products as powerful and highly generic tools, the best results are achieved when restricting the use of the different approaches to specific use cases.

Read more ...

Conclusion: VMware’s EVO hyper-converged infrastructure is the tipping point for the move away from SAN based architectures. Over the next 3-5 years VMware EVO will commoditise and simplify compute/storage infrastructures in the same fashion VMware commoditised and simplified servers.

This will disrupt traditional systems vendors (e.g., HP, IBM) and new systems vendors (e.g., Cisco, VCE) and challenge the growth and long term viability of upstart hyper-converged vendors (e.g., Nutanix and SimpliVity). However, the real challenge to EVO will be IaaS, especially VMware Air.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Organisations are increasingly leveraging the services, skills and capabilities of third party organisations to deliver high quality IT services to their organisations. At the same time, there is industry recognition that contract management skills within organisations are often under par. Well managed relationships can result in significant returns for the organisation in terms of ROI and reduced management costs. Well planned arrangements with performance measurements represent sound management practices. Going beyond the basics to mature relationships and trust dividends is even better.

Read more ...

Conclusion: In most vendor-client relationships power shifts from the client to the vendor as soon as the deal is signed. As the SMACC (Social, Mobile, Analytics, Cloud and Consumerisation) ecosystem evolves, strategies are emerging that enable power to remain with the client for the duration of the vendor-client relationship. However, this shift in power will only happen if the client actively works to eliminate vendor lock-in strategies.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Microsoft’s Software Assurance should not be viewed as a monolithic software maintenance and ‘upgrade path’ for existing solutions. Instead, it should be viewed as a collection of additional licences that extend product usage rights, and grant features for enterprise scale deployments. Knowing which Software Assurance licences to procure, and which to reject, can result in significant savings.

Read more ...

Related Articles:

"Understanding and Optimising Software Assurance: Part 2" IBRS, 2014-10-31 17:57:54

Conclusion: Business-centric IT strategies are critical to run IT-as-a-Service1 because they attempt to integrate IT with business strategies. The rationale is to support business operations by implementing new technologies that reduce business risks, create business opportunities and achieve high levels of customer satisfaction.

Business-centric IT strategies focus on addressing the business critical issues by implementing new IT solutions in a timely and cost-effective manner. The proposed IT solutions should provide capabilities that address the current and emerging market forces such as consumerisation, mobility, social media and Cloud. This will signal to business lines that IT is being modernised to meet consumers’ exigent needs.

It is critical for business-centric IT strategies to be developed within two months to accelerate IT-as-a-Service transitioning.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Security leaders should approach security frameworks as a challenge to how the organisation secures its information assets. So, security leaders should be able to defend adherence, or variation, from any point on a chosen framework. Variance may be critical for business function, but the security leader needs to know this and be able to articulate it. This is not an argument for non-compliance, but toward a deep understanding of business requirements – and being able to defend this position to internal and external auditors.

Read more ...

Once upon a time there was a programmer who developed software, working for a software vendor, and there was a CEO, a CIO, and a sales executive who all worked for a manufacturing business. It was a happy time, where everyone knew who developed software, who bought software, who implemented software, and who used software. In this long-gone era businesses delivered physical goods and professional services, and software was a helpful tool to standardise business processes and automate tedious repetitive tasks. Those were the days where hardware was solid, software was easy to deal with (certainly not harder than dealing with a teenager) and humans were the masters of the universe.

Read more ...

This month there has been a significant increase in senior appointments, restructures, collaboration and purchases in the ICT industry. In particular, service providers are acquiring or partnering with technology vendors to integrate specialised and high quality products with their services. This highlights the demand in the market for access to new and developing technologies and associated services to take advantage of them. In order to stay competitive, service providers have been forced to move beyond basic service provision and include technologies as part of their service offerings.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Vendor offerings for end-to-end solutions for ‘self-service desktops’ are both limited and immature. Furthermore, organisations are likely to have many of the individual components that comprise a self-service desktop solution. For the next 4-6 years end-user computing cycle, organisations should look to construct self-service portals from existing point solutions, rather than looking for a pre-integrated stack.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Organisations must ensure they have taken reasonable steps to not release IT equipment which contains information assets. Leading software options for wiping data will be more than adequate for most organisations, and physically destroying disks is both excessively costly and environmentally unfriendly. However, as important as ensuring that sensitive data is destroyed, it is equally important that the organisation has an audit trail to demonstrate that the data destruction policy has been followed. The more sensitive the information is, the greater the need for the assurance of an audit trail.

Read more ...

Conclusion: To improve business performance and/or reduce the cost of doing business, forward-thinking IT organisations are trying to run IT as a Service. However, they are challenged by long software implementation timescales, fragmented delivery processes and insufficient skilled resources to meet business demands.

To address these challenges, IT organisations should emulate the commercial practices related to delivering quality IT solutions at reasonable costs.

Read more ...

Conclusion: The IBRS technology investment model only assesses costs. It shows costs in net present value terms and can also compare those costs with a typical total cost of ownership calculation. It does not measure so-called benefits or other intangible features of a product. Its principal aim is to reveal what an investment will cost over its duration and to do that as thoroughly as all the data available will allow. In addition the model can be customised and work with different data sets.

Read more ...

Conclusion: Unless the IT and HR management work together to implement information systems to enable them to hire, develop and record the skills of IT professionals, the organisation will probably not have the right people to meet the looming challenges of the digital age.

Read more ...

Subscribe

Want to get the latest papers from all our advisors? Subscribe, and we'll send you the information you need.

Invalid Input
Please enter a valid email address
Invalid Input
Please enter your mobile phone number
Invalid Input