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Conclusion: Paying for Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) which is kept on-premises, but paid for on an Opex model rather than as a Capex outlay, is often positioned as ‘Cloud-like’. There can be use cases and specific workloads where this model makes sense and does give some advantages to the organisation.

However, on-premises management of an organisation’s own Cloud can be lacking in the degree of flexibility and pace of innovation that can be achieved when compared to some of the larger and more successful public Cloud offerings such as Amazon Web Services or Microsoft Azure.

Organisations need to weigh up specific use cases and workloads and determine the optimal balance of when to use ‘on-premises’ Cloud versus public Cloud.

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Conclusion: For the first time, Google has articulated a comprehensive go-to-market strategy for enterprise Cloud services. While the company has the technology and scale needed, it is only now outlining why organisations may wish to consider the Google Cloud Platform. Google will create a direct data centre presence in Australia in 2017 and is rapidly building a global services partner ecosystem. Google’s strengths (and weaknesses) compared to its two competitors, AWS and Azure, are well-reflected in its enterprise strategy. Google’s most significant announcements were not related to products, but rather its plans to address enterprise clients and develop a robust partner ecosystem. Australian organisations planning new Cloud initiatives for late 2017 or early 2018 may consider Google a viable option for enterprise Cloud infrastructure, though it will take another 12 months for Google’s local partner network to mature.

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Conclusion: Organisations deal with an array of ICT vendors, resellers, integrators or service providers. Prudent organisations will establish formal Supplier Relationship Management procedures to systematically manage the organisations’ interactions with suppliers, with goals of streamlining procedures and maximising effectiveness and value in these dealings.

Not all suppliers are equal in value, and SRM approaches for each should be measured in the effort applied.

A really effective SRM approach should enable an organisation to foster and grow strategic relationships with key suppliers capable of helping the organisation, for example, in driving competitive advantage. This would mean viewing the relationship with key suppliers as an asset and managing it as such. Organisations should also be aware of the risks in having too few strategic relationships which may stifle innovation or value over time.

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Conclusion: Mergers, acquisitions and divestitures are regular occurrences amongst ICT vendors. A lot of analysis of these announcements focuses on the potential impact on the future value of the organisations involved, particularly for investors. But each announcement means there will be changes for employees, customers and business partners.

Prudent organisations must be proactive and engaged in considering and debating how announced changes to suppliers could impact them, and assess for themselves the business implications of the potential scenarios that are likely to occur, and the risks or opportunities these present.

As each customer and business partner will have a unique relationship with the parties involved, they should do their own assessment, including seeking independent advice, of the potential ramifications of the announced changes.

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Conclusion: In the IBRS Security Leadership capability maturity model, buying more product is level 2: Alienated, and is typified by IT teams that are struggling to take on the challenge of cyber security because they address it as a technical problem. Buying product without a clear understanding of the business risk it is aiming to address is a guarantee for failure. But for organisations that understand that cyber risk is much more than IT, know there is a business risk that comes with cyber capability, and have the organisational will to address it, technology can make a significant difference in automating and accelerating capability. These three vendors, Crowdstrike, CyberArk and Tanium, are well regarded by leading Australian customers.

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Related Articles:

"Hot cyber security vendors for your shortlist Part 2 – Aussie startups" IBRS, 2017-01-01 10:35:40

"Hot cyber security vendors for your shortlist Part 3 – more Aussies" IBRS, 2018-03-31 07:06:21

Conclusion: On 1st October, Microsoft introduced a number of changes to its licensing regime, changed the names of several products, added two new packages under the new Secure Productive Enterprise (SPE) portfolio and introduced new licensing rights1.

The new licensing packages are aimed at taking organisations on a journey off Cap-Ex (persistent) licensing for devices, toward Op-Ex (subscription) licensing for users.

Understanding the new Secure Productive Enterprise licensing packages is essential for organisations embarking on a move to digital workspaces, and those renegotiating Enterprise Agreements (EAs) within the next nine months.

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Conclusion: ICT vendors invest in training their Account Managers or Sellers to be “Trusted Advisors”. The training is to improve the seller’s skill to be able to help their clients achieve success both in business and at a professional level. A client organisation’s expectations are that the vendors should at best be “Competent Advisors” in terms of the solutions or products they represent. Few, if any, employees in client organisations are relying on or expecting their success to be based on the strength of a “Trusted Advisor” from a vendor.

Few sellers can ever achieve the highly valued position of being a true “Trusted Advisor”. The way vendors manage and reward their “sellers” generally has nothing to do with the client recognising them as a “Trusted Advisor”.

Sellers from vendors know their primary measures are on their sales results. This is what their management really expects them to be focusing on and achieving.

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Conclusion: The challenge with handling threat intelligence is in assessing its relevance to an organisation, determining an appropriate response and then continual execution and reassessment. Consequently, the more comprehensive the threat intelligence service is, the greater the requirement for a customer to have existing, mature cyber security capability. Organisations must understand how they will use a threat intelligence service and what business benefit it will deliver to their organisation.

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Conclusion: Microsoft’s new strategy is to make Windows 10 the dominant enterprise desktop O/S by first winning over the consumers with a much improved user experience, then have consumers demand Windows 10 at work, forcing the enterprise to upgrade. This is Microsoft’s best desktop strategy in 10 years and IT executives must prepare a strategy1 for dealing with user demands or risk losing control of the enterprise desktop strategy.

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Conclusion: organisations have invested considerable resources over the past decade in an effort to improve their procurement capability. ICT investments were often large, complicated, and undertaken over long periods. Companies expressed concerns that they felt vulnerable when dealing with technology vendors, and their relationships often reflected protectionist behaviour. Cloud based services and other consumerisation of ICT procurement places pressure on technology companies to perform, as their customers can theoretically switch quickly and relatively painlessly if they are unhappy with products and/or services. However, organisations will need to be smart buyers to optimise the benefits of the new services on offer, but also be good customers.

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In the News

Outdated work from home policies bog down Aussie businesses - Computer Reseller News - 6 April 2020

IBRS analyst Dr. Joseph Sweeney provides best practice-advice on working from home in the current pandemic situation. Dr. Joseph Sweeney discusses current working from home policies which are...
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Centrelink crashes under demand for crisis payments - Australian Financial Review - 23 march 2020

IBRS workforce transformation advisor Joseph Sweeney said many government departments had to navigate difficult IT environments that were only part-way through their digital transformations, with...
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Inside EY's security work at ANZ - Australian Financial Review - 3 March 2020

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Google cloud boss looks to AI as it fights Amazon, Microsoft duopoly - Australian Financial Review - 2 March 2020

IBRS analyst Joe Sweeney has been tracking the three major Cloud vendors capabilities in AI and said Google is right to believe it has an edge over AWS and Microsoft when it comes to corpus (the...
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What should be in Australia’s next cyber security strategy? - Computer Weekly - 10 Feb 2020

Peter Sandilands, an advisor at analyst firm IBRS, called the discussion paper “a pre-judged survey” that is mostly looking for answers. He also questioned if the resulting recommendations would be...
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