Rob Mackinnon

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Conclusion: Most major IT implementations such as ERP roll-outs, do not fully realise their original objectives. One symptom is that planned functionality is not utilised by staff to the fullest extent. Another is a tendency for staff to fall back to their comfort zones, using manually-maintained records, spreadsheets and the like. The root cause is that insufficient attention is paid to dealing with the human aspects of change. Knock-on effects are largely financial. If additional resources need to be brought in to effect lasting change, this action dilutes the strength of the original business case, not only in terms of outright cost but in the time taken to achieve desired outcomes. If left untreated, the full benefits may never be realised.


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Conclusion: Many organisations have made a major commitment to ITIL to lift their IT service delivery1 capabilities. ITIL is valuable in providing a lingua franca for IT service delivery professionals and is an excellent frame of reference for process improvement. However, a single-minded focus on ITIL to improve service delivery is akin to taking vitamins as the only strategy for improving our health. Extending that analogy, establishing an effective IT service delivery strategy first requires a general medical examination. Then, using the results obtained, a holistic and targeted program can be developed aimed at improving overall health outcomes.


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The financial press has begun using the term GFC as a short form for the Global Financial Crisis. Whilst outside the scope of this paper to speculate on the length and socio-economic effects of the GFC, there is no doubt that its impact will be experienced widely across business sectors and indeed within government. As consumer confidence recedes, corporate earnings shrink and revenue forecasts are revised downward, nothing is more certain than IT budgets being trimmed in 2009.

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Conclusion: In our experience many Business Intelligence (BI) initiatives end up well short of their original objectives. But all is not lost. Sometimes it helps to learn from the experiences of others. For those:

  • Intending to embark on a new BI initiative
  • Working to remediate a BI strategy that had lost momentum.

This research paper examines some case studies and examples which reference breakthrough approaches and reflect the sometimes arduous travails involved in dealing with the many challenges presented by BI projects.


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Conclusion: To gain insight into C-level executive intentions with information management, Accenture carried out a global survey2 in 2007. Whilst the majority of respondents had well-developed views on the power of Business Intelligence (BI) as a strategic differentiator, the report unearthed an underlying frustration in achieving their vision of an organisation-wide BI capability. This echoes our experiences in the ANZ market in which we observe many CIOs struggling to bring their complete BI visions to reality.


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Conclusion: In March 2001 the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) published a management brief1 addressing problems in implementing large IT projects in the public and private sectors. Observations in this report included “...budgets are exceeded, deadlines are over-run and often the quality of the new system is far below the standard agreed when the project was undertaken”.


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Conclusion: A new age for business applications is unfolding. Arguably, in 2008 applications are at a tipping point akin to that experienced in the early to mid-1990s, which was marked by the emergence of mature ERP technology and subsequent explosive sales growth. CIOs are urged to put applications firmly on their radar and begin acting upon their application portfolios as well as the methodologies and governance approaches that underpin them.


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Conclusion: ‘May you live in interesting times’ is reputedly a Chinese curse. It is also a phrase that will resonate with CIOs, who in 2008 are challenged by their organisations to concurrently act as:

  • One of the drivers of corporate innovation,

  • A generator of cost-savings; whilst

  • Contributing to the corporate green agenda.


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Conclusion: In 2008, corporate databases reached unprecedented sizes. Yet despite the abundance and diversity of data, many organisations remain challenged by Business Intelligence (BI) initiatives. They buy on vendor promise, but many have difficulty fulfilling it. Against this backdrop, and in a confusing post-acquisition market, BI vendors continue to release increasingly sophisticated and capable products.


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Conclusion: When a CIO is appointed he or she becomes the centre of attention in their new IT ecosystem. Major demands will be placed on the CIO’s time by those seeking to espouse their views on IT and effective judgement will be needed to filter essential input from dross. Being visible and accessible within the organisation is important at this time. Drawn from broadly-based stakeholder input, a principle-based framework needs to be established setting out the new IT leader’s agenda. This should be followed through with decisive action. Adjust the plan quarterly to ensure continued relevance.


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Conclusion: From the moment a new CIO is appointed, the clock starts ticking as organisational scrutiny commences. Generally, a new CIO has 100 days to prove his or her worth. However, from the new CIO’s point of view, the clock should start ticking 20 days earlier. This is when savvy incoming CIOs can carry out due diligence on their new organisation and begin planning to ensure the strongest possible impression is made in the vital 100 days. In addition, the new CIO needs to carefully select the most appropriate driving modalities that best characterise the major themes the new IT leader will pursue. Failure to act as outlined may prove career limiting.


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Conclusion: Three previous articles on this topic were triggered by a January 2006 McKinsey & Co. survey1 on the IT spending patterns of 37 retail and wholesale banks. The survey revealed a surprising paradox. Those that were the lowest spenders were judged as delivering the greatest business value from their investment in IT.


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Conclusion: Two previous articles on this topic were triggered by a January 2006 McKinsey & Co. survey1 on the IT spending patterns of 37 retail and wholesale banks. In essence, it showed that the lowest spenders were judged as delivering the greatest business value from their investment in IT.


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This article is indebted to the Monty Python team and their infamous sketch on the Ministry of Silly Walks, which remains a cross-generational favourite with comedy audiences worldwide some 37 years after it was first broadcast.

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