Rob Mackinnon

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Conclusion: Organisations striving to reduce their cost base may choose to investigate shared services strategies in areas such as Finance, Human Resources and IT. Changing past practices, and more importantly delivering bottom line benefits, can be challenging, particularly in IT. Whilst the stakes may be high, the organisational risk can also be high and resistance is likely to be encountered from those who fear their futures threatened by any planned changes.


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Conclusion: Irrespective of organisational size or business sector there is an extraordinary sameness to many of the activities carried out by IT Departments. Interviewing CIOs in a variety of organisations bears this out. In 2006, some of the common threads of activity include:


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Conclusion: Business Process Re-engineering (BPR) has been reborn, albeit in a new form. After achieving cult-like status for a number of years in the 1990s following publication of the book “Reengineering the Corporation”, authored by Michael Hammer and James Champy, BPR seemed to disappear from the corporate radar.


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Since IT began as a profession, within many organisations there seems to have been some degree of tension between IT and Finance.

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Conclusion: Due to their scale of operation and the massive databases they need to manage, Australia’s major banks often act as a bellwether for other IT users. This is certainly the case at present as a number of banks commit to Master Data Management (MDM) in an effort to bring their management reporting into order.


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Conclusion: Knowledge Management (KM) is often thought of as a dark art. It’s not. Many organisations can benefit in tangible ways (e.g. quick access to a problem database in a Help Desk context) by harvesting the knowledge that already exists within them.

The last article on KM concerned explicit knowledge management, being knowledge that has already been articulated in some form within an organisation. This article is focused on tacit or implicit knowledge which is concerned with the experiences of individuals.


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Conclusion: In the early 1990s software vendors spoke lyrically of capturing the corporate memory through use of the new products they were launching into the then emerging Knowledge Management (KM) market. Fuelled by success with document and image management solutions, then later by collaboration software such as Lotus Notes, vendors considered KM as the next blockbuster application.


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Conclusion: Stories of late and failed projects are legion within information technology. Whilst there are may be many reasons for project failure, a key root cause, largely overlooked in the literature, is failure to correctly enunciate user requirements. A less than satisfactory outcome at the requirements definition stage can only become magnified as the project proceeds.


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Conclusion: The CIO organisation can be considered as the CEO organisation in microcosm. Both domains encounter similar issues: strategy, market penetration and credibility, cost reductions and so on.

As with last month’s article, this one draws on insights gained from studies of major corporations and is intended to provide inspiration to CIOs keen to improve practices and lift performance within their domain.


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Conclusion: Some of the lessons from corporate management literature can be applied to the successful running of an IT shop. This article contains insights gained from studies of some of the world’s most admired companies and provides new ways to think about planning for the future through the application of the ‘three horizons’ technique.


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2006 marks a significant 50 year anniversary for computing in Australia. On July 4th 1956 it is claimed that the first program was run on SILLIAC, a valve computer that was assembled and housed at the Physics Department of the University of Sydney. Over the years much political mileage has been made on both sides of politics, about how Australians have often been at the forefront in pioneering new technologies, but have been slow in exploiting and commercialising them. However, these assertions need to be tested, certainly as far as information technology is concerned.


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The media was replete in November of reports that Telstra would be replacing and decommissioning approximately 1200 legacy systems. For instance, Mike Sainsbury in the Australian Business Section on 17 November, compared the systems to a ‘bowl of spaghetti’ on the assumption they were entwined and it would take a mammoth job to untangle them.


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Conclusion: There is an increasing trend for the IT function to become decentralised. Feedback from IBRS clients indicates that more than 60% of organisations have elected to adopt some form of decentralised IT responsibility. Our observation is that this figure is increasing, driven by:


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Conclusion: The end of the calendar year is always a time of soul-searching and reflection. What has been nagging you this year that you know can be improved upon next year? Before 2006 begins in earnest, think about some of the aspects of CIO life that could be changed for the better.


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