Rob Mackinnon

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Conclusion: With the increasing sophistication of application software, it seems inconceivable in 2005 for any organisation to have data quality problems. Yet it is a problem that does occur more frequently than many recognise.


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Conclusion: Manywho have outsourced their Service Desk complain that in doing so they lost touch with the pulse of their organisation. Bringing the Service Desk back in-house allows customer and IT intimacy to be re-established.


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Conclusion: Manyfirst-generation outsourcing arrangements have reached or are approaching their end dates. Users are taking fresh approaches to outsourcing with past lessons learnt being encapsulated into new deals.

What are the major lessons learnt? How will next generation outsourcing deals be constructed? What should be done differently this time around? Where to start?


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For the federal government, the forthcoming sale of Telstra has taken the Industrial Relations debate off the front page of our newspapers. This must provide some relief at a time when they were faring poorly in the public relations debate with the union movement. Whilst the legislation is still being drafted and is not expected to be available until late October, the central proposition is to deregulate the labour market.

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Conclusion: At the big end of town some remarkable process improvement breakthroughs are being achieved with a combination of Lean Manufacturing and Six Sigma philosophies. However, the benefits that can be realised from these techniques can also be enjoyed by medium sized enterprises. Using recent work carried out by the Commonwealth Bank of Australia (CBA) through its Commway initiative, this article briefly charts their journey to date and provides advice for those who wish to embark on similar journeys.


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Conclusion: The mid-1990s was a gold rush for ERP vendors. The ERP concept of integrating disparate corporate applications was right for its time and was superbly promoted by major players such as SAP who ran saturation campaigns directed at CXOs. I experienced it first hand, being one of them at the time! The gold rush continued through the decade. Drivers included the market momentum the ERP storm had generated coupled with corporate anxiety about legacy system’s likely inability to meet Year 2000 compliance requirements.


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Conclusion: As executive management become more cynical about technology’s ability to deliver change, they continue to depend upon it as an enabler whilst keeping a closer rein than ever on the IT spending component of change programs. This places enormous pressure on the IT Executive. However, change programs are not just about technology. The problem is that the IT component is usually the most visible, and often the most expensive part of a change program. In my experience, if an IT-based project fails to deliver, though the Project Sponsor may nominally be responsible, the technology is often blamed and it is the IT Executive who may well be brought to account by association.


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Conclusion: Putting forward arguments for IT business/process improvement can sometimes bring about eye-glazed responses from senior executives. ISO/IEC1 15288:2002 ‘Systems Engineering – System lifecycle processes’, hereafter ISO 15288, can be an ally in terms of providing an authoritative source of reference when putting forward a case for change. It is a comprehensive standard that covers all system life cycle processes from Stakeholder Requirements Definition through to System Disposal as well as providing guidance on essential governance matters.


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Conclusion: System erosion concerns the run down state that systems decline into when improperly tended by management, users and IT staff. Whilst there are many characteristics that describe eroded systems, the common theme is that these systems fail to provide the value originally ascribed to them when the business case to develop them was prepared.


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The information and communications technologies market is emerging from its torpor. After the spending excesses of Y2K, then the GST, followed by the bursting of the dotcom bubble and the demise of some major consulting practices, the past four years have been positively somnolent for an industry that has always enjoyed double-digit growth.

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Conclusion: Last month I wrote advising IT practitioners to learn the language of risk management, particularly in the context of ANZ/NZS 4360:2004. The article also contained advice to ensure that IT has a place at the decision-making table when considering the implementation of corporate risk management software.

An assumption was made in the article that in your organisation some corporate risk management initiatives were already under consideration. However, suppose this is not the case. How can the IT practitioner pitch a case for an Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) project as a strategic system? This article provides a guide for doing so, allowing the IT practitioner to assert leadership in a burgeoning area of corporate practice.


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Conclusion: In business and government, the subject of risk continues to be a hot topic. It’s covered regularly by the commerce and technology-oriented sections of the media and is increasingly being discussed and actioned at Board and executive levels. Because of the corporate appetite for risk methodologies and tools, a burgeoning IT industry has developed providing risk management software.


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Conclusion: Effective IT strategic planning is more relevant than ever in 2005 as IT budgets continue to be straitened and IT units remain under pressure to prove their corporate worth. Whilst there are many approaches to developing an IT Strategic Plan, a zero-based approach is more likely to resonate with business stakeholders and provide successful outcomes than other approaches.


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Conclusion: Delivering real business improvement in Workforce Automation & Management practices has proven elusive for many organisations. Two principal factors seem to have been at play. Firstly, a piecemeal approach seems to have been taken with a focus on rostering rather than on the entire process chain (see diagram). Secondly, the organisational change management effort seems to have been underestimated. With so few opportunities available to businesses to deliver bottom line savings from application software initiatives, it is now timely to revisit this area. Further, increasing safety-awareness in sectors such as mining, construction and transportation, have highlighted the need to achieve success with WAM initiatives, in some cases driven by the need to comply with fatigue management standards for rostered staff.


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