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Conclusion: The notifiable data breach regulations have had an impact on business priorities. For any organisation subject to the regulations, protection of personal information should have become a priority. One security technology, data loss prevention, could have offered some assistance. But it has had a mixed reception in the past due to many issues in both implementing and operating the service.

The continued move to SaaS for office systems such as document creation and email is also changing the market. Many capabilities that have been previously offered as standalone products are now being subsumed into the SaaS offerings as just adjunct functions. 

This simplifies the selection of the products and their ongoing management. A prime example of this is data loss prevention which is now being offered as a check-box selected capability in several SaaS offerings.

This could put data loss prevention within reach of small to medium businesses as a component of their personal information protection strategy.

Conclusion: Given the reality of shrinking budgets, organisations can struggle deciding what new products to purchase or techniques to implement. They hope the new capabilities will enhance their security posture, but new tools often need additional staff to operate them. Employing skilled security staff can itself be a challenge. A simple but pragmatic approach is to leverage IT operation’s budget and skills to improve operational hygiene and hence, overall security hygiene.

Conclusion: Recently, several architectural models and tools have become available to enable the microsegmentation of networks, which helps improve overall security within organisations and can help limit the scope of any potential breach within an organisation. This can be achieved by aligning microsegmentation of networks with the organisation’s mission-critical systems profile.

Organisations should ensure microsegmentation is included in their security strategy. However, there are several different architectural approaches and organisations should explore these and select the approach that most suits their current or planned enterprise architecture and assess the benefits each approach may offer.

Conclusion: Over the past decade, the role of the Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) has risen to be one of great importance in many large and mid-sized organisations. While this remains the case, protecting information assets is more likely to be successful through ensuring all threats are managed under the same set of policies and principles. Managing threats to organisations can no longer be separated between departments or siloed out to service providers. With data in the Cloud and people on the ground in new geographies, the need to evolve the relationship between logical and physical controls has increased. The key to holistic security is to bring all aspects of security under one umbrella to ensure all bases are covered.

Conclusion: Throughout the year, most businesses invite in a third party to conduct an information security risk assessment – as per best practice. Often this is a compliance exercise, other times it is just good housekeeping. Assessors are paid to find gaps in security controls based on the threat landscape and risk profile and provide recommendations for how to better secure the organisation with appropriate controls. With a thud-worthy report in hand, those charged with remediation must prioritise the recommended tasks to best use their resources to appropriately protect the organisation.

Conclusion: Relying on third parties to succeed in business has become the norm. Cost limitations and workforce requirements mean that businesses need to find efficient ways to achieve their goals. This regularly includes creating an ecosystem of organisations that offer technology, consulting and support services that can be leveraged when required for a fraction of the cost of employing a person or service in-house to the same end. This is great from a business perspective; however, engaging with third parties brings significant risk. Businesses are effectively opening their door to a perfect stranger and inviting them into their organisation to look around, share some data and stay a while. Managing the risk of having a third party connected to an organisation is important. An organisation’s security controls become meaningless once data is transferred to a third party. At the end of the day, if a cyber-attack occurs via a third party, there will be more than one reputation on the line in the eyes of current and future business partners, customers and clients. 

While the impact of a third-party data breach cannot be completely prevented, the key to resilience, detection and management of connections is awareness, being upfront about the security expectations and educating the workforce.

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Conclusion: CIOs should consider the environments for their PROTECTED information, both when building new capability and/or when renewing older infrastructure and services. The need to have cost-effective infrastructure services (in-house or IaaS), accredited security of services and responsiveness for clients using the service are three key deliverables for any CIO.

The Australian Government has identified PROTECTED ratings be applied where systems and data are at risk and where the systems or data are critical to ensuring national interest, business continuity and integrity of an individual’s data. Critical business functions are a combination of the IT systems they run on and the data they consume.

Defining what should be afforded a PROTECTED rating and therefore adequately protected is an ongoing challenge. The Australian Government’s Information Security Manual (ISM) and recent legislation “Security of Critical Infrastructure Act 2018” detail the requirements and framework for reporting, on government-run IT systems and critical infrastructure. Using this framework as a base, organisations should assess whether the data or IT environments that support critical business functions should be treated as PROTECTED.

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Conclusion: Fraud and cybercrime can both keep key stakeholders in a business awake at night. But these threats are often driven by very different malicious motivations. In the end, the two threats overlap but are very different. Fraud is a crime carried out for financial gain. Cybercrime on the other hand can be executed for many reasons including political, passion and even opportunistically, purely because a vulnerability was there. Aside from reasons/motivation, two other key differences include skill set needed to manage such threats and the delivery method of the event. Organisations need to prepare for both of these threats to be realised and cannot always rely on the controls of one to detect, prevent or manage the impact of the other.

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Conclusion: Passwords are the weakest link (some might say second to humans) in the enterprise security chain. With compromised credentials (a username and password) being the leading cause of data breach1, passwords and even the stronger passphrases are no longer sufficient to protect users or businesses from unauthorised access to critical data and systems. As such, an additional layer of security, namely two-factor authentication (2FA), is now commonly available. The term two-factor or multi-factor authentication has become commonplace and while it materially reduces a business’s risk to several cyber threats, many end users feel that it is an inconvenience, slows down productivity and prefer not to “opt-in” if that is at all an option. The bottom line is that 2FA is complementary to strong passwords – it is not a replacement for them. Raising education and awareness of the importance of strong passwords is still needed and 2FA is simply another layer of protection, akin to a more secure bolt on the door to our sensitive information.

Related Articles:

"Applying The Five Knows of Cyber Security (Video)" IBRS, 2016-08-15 02:39:16

"Securing IT for Executives travelling to high risk countries" IBRS, 2015-04-01 00:30:00

"Train your staff in esafety" IBRS, 2018-02-01 10:17:28

Conclusion: The question of “how much security is enough” often stems from attempts to define ballpark security budgets, meet compliance obligations and scope out security team size and make-up. But how much security is enough depends on a number of factors that an organisation must consider before seeking the endorsement of the security strategy and agreeing on an acceptable risk position.

Related Articles:

"Is security really an IT problem?" IBRS, 2018-08-01 08:53:13

"Sometimes good security does not mention security" IBRS, 2016-05-05 00:04:00

"Top 10 considerations when running an incident response drill" IBRS, 2018-09-04 13:29:16

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