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Sourcing & Staffing

Conclusion: Leaders play an integral role in setting the team or office culture which, if positive, improves the effectiveness and performance of that team. Be patient as it takes time to turn around a suffering team, even if they are recruited to transform and instil positive cultural change.

Conclusion: Too often the CIO or program/project executive will focus on the more tangible aspects of developing a new ICT system, bunch of processes, environments and the like only to have the new initiative fail as a result of risk averse and increasingly change weary and cynical employees1. Successful leaders need to spend increasing time and effort on getting all stakeholders on-side at all levels to implement and make sustainable positive change.

Conclusion: This month, strategic focuses and plans for managed service providers have been prominent. As the current market remains highly flexible and prone to change, vendors must plan ahead while providing customers with tangible business responses to evolving markets. In particular, areas such as security, analytics and digital transformation are set for increased growth this year, as well as associated, offshoot industries that support areas in high demand.

Conclusion: This month, financial results reporting for the first half of the 2017 financial year have shown steady growth for many IT managed service providers. Vendors that have acquired other companies to enhance or expand service offerings often report positive outcomes, provided those businesses can be successfully integrated with existing operations. Without carefully assessing potential acquisitions and developing a solid transition plan, difficulties can arise because of unsuccessful integration and restructuring efforts. A stringent consolidation plan is required for vendors to incorporate acquisitions and fully exploit specialist products and skills obtained from these investments. It is critical for vendors to assess their own service capacities, capabilities of potential business acquisitions and determine how they can be consolidated to improve service offerings.
In addition, careful planning is required for acquisitions that require business transformation, as well as other potential shifts, such as different target markets or strategic objectives. These efforts can be complex and expensive, but highly beneficial for vendors. There is a need to provide unique, innovative and efficient solutions to customers in a fast-paced and competitive industry, and acquisitions can facilitate this type of market differentiation.

Conclusion: It is easier to assess the applicant against technical skills and experience than assessing against soft skills. The time to assess soft skills is at the interview. Ask behavioural questions and recruit the more Emotionally Intelligent candidate. This applies to every recruitment position no matter how technically important the skills are.

Conclusion: Prominent this month were agreements and discussions that highlight shifts in the ICT outsourcing market, with increasing demand for targeted solutions to support business functions and long-term goals. These types of offerings have become more common, and are no longer niche services. Set solutions, which are sufficiently flexible to be tailored to individual customers, have become the norm. These solutions bundle a wide range of technologies, associated services and specialist staff, while utilising new business models for the provision of end-to-end services. In order to remain competitive, and facilitate the adoption of new solutions such as the Internet of Things (IoT) vendors are bundling offerings which go beyond the performance of business functions or expanding existing functionality.
Catering to specific goals such as increased customer engagement or the need for monitoring and analysis systems to help with business evolution or protocol development are becoming increasingly popular. Vendors have recognised the importance of portfolios which include extensive suites of strategic managed services that are efficient, diverse and easily customised to individual needs.

Conclusion: This month saw a focus on the development of improved controls over vendor activities due to the high number of recent outsourced solutions failures and serious impacts on customers. In particular, establishing internal early threat detection teams for initial development phases and more stringent, ongoing reviews. These types of activities flag a change in the outsourcing environment, with increased customer involvement in contract execution throughout all phases of an agreement and set processes to assist with technical issues that may arise before implementation as well as basic contract management. This type of involvement can help minimise risks associated with the adoption and consumption of new technologies and business models, with a greater emphasis on frameworks to circumvent threats as well as respond to them.

Conclusion: This month saw a focus on customer priorities and greater demand for niche or highly specialised IT services. In particular, there was a shift in IT investment centred on cost savings to ongoing strategic initiatives which facilitate innovation and expansion to maintain competitive advantage. These types of priorities can be advantageous for enterprises hoping to increase operational efficiencies or avoid irrelevancy in changing markets. However, without adequate preparation and thorough assessments of existing and potential environments, large-scale alterations to business operations can be hazardous, negating potential benefits. Risks associated with unforeseen skills deficits, complexities associated with consolidating or replacing environments and business process changes must be considered carefully. An increased uptake of business consultancy services to manage high-level alterations and avert or respond to difficulties indicates an awareness of the necessity to establish solid plans in conjunction with vendors that can be flexible and sensitive to customer needs.

Conclusion: Too often in organisations, executives focus on the more mechanical elements of Project and Business Management but ignore the need to develop the skills of their staff and encourage them to succeed.

Team members’ salary is rarely in itself a motivator to get things done.1 Many motivational positive factors, when combined, get the results needed to get the most out of each team with minimal staff losses along the way.

Conclusion: IT management teams that spend little time planning to grow and retain talented people will find it hard and expensive to keep pace with technology advances and business model changes. Conversely, IT management that makes every effort to retain staff are likely to be employers that attract the best people. They will do this by helping them enhance their skills and recognise their achievements.

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