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Sue Johnston

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Sue Johnston is an IBRS advisor who focuses on strategy and governance of private and public enterprise ICT. Sue is able to critique and comment on strategy, ICT investment and innovation management. Sue is also engaged in research on maximising the value of flexible workplaces and women in leadership. Sue has more than 25 years experience as an ICT professional, CIO, business manager and consultant working in diverse organisations in the public and private sector. Sue is passionate about engendering innovation and best practice management in all sized organisations and is a highly regarded advisor and public speaker.

Conclusion: There has been considerable research and media coverage on the role of the CIO and its relevance in the new digital era. Cloud services are making big inroads and traditional responsibilities are changing. This could signal the end of the role of CIO in organisations or, at the very least, dramatically change the scope of responsibility and divide the function. Over the next 3-5 years many CIO roles will be restructured into two roles and this is already occurring internationally and Australia wide. Organisations are making this change because they need to position for change and growth and they do not feel that the CIO can lead that change. In many instances the CIO either leaves the organisation or is allocated to run internal operations and a new digital chief is appointed for the more externally facing growth positions. Savvy CIOs will position themselves to lead this alignment activity, divest responsibility for low growth value activities and remain relevant into the future.


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Conclusion: Innovation is becoming increasingly important in the 21st century organisation, whether it be companies growing or keeping their customers or the public sector, trying to deliver services with ever decreasing budget – innovation will play a key role as established models for business processes become increasingly under strain. A crucial part of innovation is ideas management. Ideas management involves how to generate and capture ideas, how to select and progress ideas and how to diffuse ideas.

Many organisations focus on the tools and technology available to improve idea management within their organisation, but this ignores the other important elements including strategy, people and processes, resulting in a low level of maturity and often a poor performance of implementing ideas. Improving maturity across all the elements of idea management increases the opportunity to find the best ideas and get them implemented. While a high level of maturity across all elements may not be feasible or desirable, organisations should identify those areas that are important and ensure they optimise these.


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Conclusion: Cloud computing offers many opportunities for organisations. There are shifts in the market which are producing an increase in third party cloud brokers who are offering to undertake an agent role between organisations and the many cloud service providers that are appearing in the market.

However, the reality is that for the next few years most organisations will adopt a hybrid model which requires the ICT organisation to manage the adoption of cloud services with legacy services. The transition period offers an opportunity for CIOs to position themselves as the broker of ICT services for their organisation, but will often require a shift in attitude and focus.


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Conclusion: It is widely accepted that ICT plays an ever-increasing role in almost all aspects of personal and business activities. As an industry, ICT has made many significant contributions over the past few decades. However, despite an instrumental role in business ICT continues to suffer from negative perceptions in terms of its professionalism and conduct and many business customers are frustrated by the limited avenues available to demand standards of service, professional conduct, complaints management, and dispute resolution.

There are various industry bodies supporting the ICT industry at both an individual and organisational level. There is a perception that the industry self-regulates in a limited way as there is currently no significant formal independent oversight of the industry. Without an appropriate regulatory framework for the ICT industry there is no independent complaints management mechanism and little recourse for misconduct which impacts on customer confidence and the ability of the industry to collectively improve professionalism and standards.


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Related Articles:

"ICT: Not yet a profession Part 1" IBRS, 2013-09-27 00:00:00

Conclusion: ICT plays an integral role in almost all areas of society. Over the past two decades there have been spectacular failures with the implementation of ICT business improvements. These failures have cost organisations millions of dollars in direct costs and revenue, damaged brands and even contributed to a number of company failures .ICT as an area of expertise has been evolving over the past few decades but has not yet reached the level of a profession. There continues to be a lack of structure and clarity to the many roles undertaken in ICT, no professional accreditation that is widely valued and demanded and no formal mechanism to enforce accountability.

This is largely due to the diversity of roles categorised under the umbrella of ICT, the limited membership of professional bodies, lack of business expectation that an ICT worker will belong to a professional body and the lack of enforceable accountability as a consequence of the low membership.


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Related Articles:

"ICT not yet a profession Part 2 - Regulatory oversight" IBRS, 2013-10-27 00:00:00

Conclusion: Vendor performance evaluation is a critical component of successful contract execution and has been an area of difficulty for the ICT industry. Deciding what to evaluate, when and how often to evaluate, how to collect the data necessary to undertake the evaluation and fulfilling the responsibilities of a customer requires commitment, planning and active participation. However, CIOs will be rewarded with improved supplier relationships and more successful contract engagements.


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There’s a long history of fad terms and acronyms in the information technology field – EDP, VM, CRM, EDI, iPad, iPod, tablet, BPO, ad infinitum, and of course the latest – Cloud.

The advent of all things Cloud introduced new terms such IaaS, PaaS, SaaS to classify layers of technology such as infrastructure, platforms and software that could take advantage of the Cloud – ‘Everything as a Service’.


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Conclusion: ICT Strategic Planning is undertaken by organisations in both the private and public sectors every year. Many organisations limit their strategies to high level objectives and do not take the next step to include metrics to measure the success of their strategies. For CIOs, this means putting a stake in the ground for which their performance and the performance of ICT will be measured. Not including metrics can result in strategic plans that are shelfware, not understood by the business and not providing the opportunity to demonstrate to the organisation how far they have travelled and the benefit that ICT can offer the organisation.


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Conclusion: The concept of innovation has been gaining wider acceptance in the past few years, particularly in line with the explosion of the Internet and social media. However, many organisations are still following the model that new ideas will be generated by the clever people within the organisation or will come from those external partners that are already known to the organisation. This outdated model does not provide the opportunity for organisations to identify great ideas that could provide significant benefit to their organisation. There is growing adoption of a broader based innovation method known as ‘Open Innovation’ that offers considerable benefit to organisations that embrace it.


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Conclusion: CIOs and technology leaders will often have relationships with many suppliers and vendors. This can be transactional in nature and limited to an exchange of goods or services for payment. A strategic partnership is a longer and deeper relationship and has many of the same characteristics of a good marriage and many benefits. However, organisations often focus on having a good process and underestimate the real imperative of good relationships which is harder to achieve but is the clear differentiation between a transactional relationship and a strategic partnership.


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