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  • Conclusion: Passwords are the weakest link (some might say second to humans) in the enterprise security chain. With compromised credentials (a username and password) being the leading cause of data breach1, passwords and even the stronger passphrases are no longer sufficient to protect users or businesses from unauthorised

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  • Conclusion: A major benefit from using a framework is to support better decision making and help deliver consistent outcomes. When it comes to security and risk, a framework is only as useful as the intellectual effort required to understand the framework and how it applies to an organisation’s risks. While some frameworks call for much documentation, IBRS argues that

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  • Conclusion: There are three levers being applied to the cyber security maturity of specific parts of the Australian economy. These three levers are the Notifiable Data Breaches Scheme, the Security of Critical Infrastructure Bill, and Prudential Standard CPS 234 “Information Security”. These levers each address an area of importance for the national economic wellbeing, and

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  • Conclusion: UpGuard, Nuix and WithYouWithMe each have a proven capability to address an important aspect of the cyber defences of Australian organisations. WithYouWithMe is about people, UpGuard is about ensuring process is adhered to and exceptions are visible, and Nuix delivers technology which, through a data processing engine, enables organisations to make sense of large

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  • Conclusion: The foreseeability of cyber incidents is widely accepted, but many organisations still have not done the work to identify their own exposures and ascertain what they would do in a crisis. The openness of shipping giant Maersk in talking about the impact of the NotPetya malware on the organisation should be viewed through the lens of “what would that look like if

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  • Conclusion:Third party bug bounty programs can be an effective way of incentivising security researchers around the world to share a discovered vulnerability. Third party bug bounty programs are invaluable as they help provide a structure for responsible disclosure and minimise the opportunity for the vulnerability to be exploited. When a bug bounty company uses

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  • Conclusion:Cyber security is an area in which organisations do not compete. They each face similar risks and threats, and it is only through the development of trusted relationships and the resulting collaboration that Australian organisations can work together to sustain their own operations and maintain the economic wellbeing of the nation in the face of cyber

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  • Conclusion:Cyber security incidents are a foreseeable business risk, and organisations must learn from the ongoing litany of cyber incidents that accompany any digital enterprise. Organisations that have data at their core live or die by how they manage this asset. The Equifax data breach is an unfortunate example of an organisation of senior business executives that were

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  • Conclusion:Cyber insurance is claimed to help recoup the losses sustained by an organisation from a raft of incidents that may or may not be “cyber”. It is imperative that organisations understand their data assets and business processes, and the risks to these, before engaging with an insurer. With a changing legislative environment, there is a role to play for insurance

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  • Conclusion:The recent high profile malware incidents, WannaCry and NotPetya, are a bellwether for a change in what the industry should reasonably expect online. WannaCry demonstrated that a group with nation state links can target everyone online, simply to harvest money. NotPetya demonstrated that a group with nation state links can target a nation’s economy with the

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  • Conclusion:Cyber threats and incidents will continue to be covered in the mainstream media, and local organisations will increasingly become part of this coverage. Not only may these stories get reported more frequently and in more depth, but local board members will become increasingly aware of what the technical aspects around cyber security mean. Reporting to the board is

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  • Conclusion: Much like the fable of the Boy Who Cried Wolf, the security industry has a limited number of opportunities to channel enterprise and national attention to cyber incidents. The WannaCry ransomware worm runs the risk of using up that credit for the security industry as so little impact was felt in Australia. The lack of local impact was more due to luck, and we

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  • Conclusion: Ransomware is a widespread scourge in the local region and organisations must take steps to address this eminently foreseeable risk. User education is necessary, but it is not sufficient to address this risk – otherwise it would already have been dealt with. Organisations must review their information systems and become rigorous on technical hygiene

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  • Conclusion: IT executives must appreciate that managed security services is not a simple IT outsourcing function, because cyber security it not merely an IT problem. Engagement with an MSSP (managed security service provider) is using a vendor to help manage the highly dynamic risks of conducting operations in a modern, hyper-connected environment. This engagement has cost

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  • Conclusion: Security awareness programs are an attempt to change staff behaviour for the protection of an organisation’s information assets, and also an attempt to change corporate culture to support and encourage desirable behaviours. However, security awareness programs also run the risk of overwhelming staff with too much fear, uncertainly, and doubt. A disempowering

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  • Conclusion: In the IBRS Security Leadership capability maturity model, buying more product is level 2: Alienated, and is typified by IT teams that are struggling to take on the challenge of cyber security because they address it as a technical problem. Buying product without a clear

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    • Gain valuable insights into how security leaders are positioning cyber-security and risk within their organisations
    • Be able to self-assess how your organisation measures up on the IBRS capability maturity model for security leadership
    • Learn how to position cyber-security so that it
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  • With the recent issues that the ABS has experienced trying to execute an online census, IBRS is sharing an Advisory Paper by James Turner which reviews a practical framework that helps organisations make better decisions with their information assets and service providers.

    Applying

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    "Applying the Five Knows of Cyber Security" IBRS, 2015-08-01 00:32:04

  • Conclusion: Cyber security can be perceived by outsiders as an occult domain. Psychologically, people can respond in many ways to something they do not understand with responses ranging from denial to fear. Consequently, a frequent challenge to better security

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  • Conclusion: As cyber security gains awareness among business leaders, many organisations are undertaking new cyber risk management initiatives. However, these initiatives can be misdirected if business leaders are not clear on why they are

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  • Conclusion: Organisations must understand that cyber risk is not merely a technical issue that can be delegated to IT but is a business issue that comes hand-in-hand from operating in a modern, online, ecosystem. Until

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  • Conclusion: Unless an organisation has an already strong cyber security capability, or the budget and appetite to progress its maturity very quickly through expanding its headcount and changing business processes, it is unlikely that any security tool

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  • Conclusion: The role of a cyber security executive is challenging at the best of times, as they need to continually strike a balance between informing and influencing, without continually alarming. But the context surrounding why an organisation creates a cyber security executive role is critical to the success of cyber risk management. Executive level commitment

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  • Conclusion: The challenge with handling threat intelligence is in assessing its relevance to an organisation, determining an appropriate response and then continual execution and reassessment. Consequently, the more comprehensive the threat intelligence service is, the greater the requirement for a customer to have existing,

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  • Conclusion: There are two compelling information security reasons for creating a sense of purpose and ownership within an organisation. The first is that a sense of purpose and ownership will empower staff so that they move from responding to basic security hygiene matters, towards pre-empting issues. The second reason is so that organisations look out beyond

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  • Conclusion: Non-IT executives are often reported as being concerned about the prospect of a cyber incident, but as security is not their area of expertise, responsibility for mitigation and preparation is often devolved to IT. This is a mistake, because as much as lack of any security could be devastating, applying the wrong controls to an organisation can be

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  • Conclusion: It is undeniable that Cloud services will only become more important to organisations. However, executives must bear in mind that as increasing Cloud adoption meets an onslaught of cyber-attacks, regulators and courts will be looking for evidence that organisations exercised due care in vendor selection and support of information

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  • Conclusion: Lockheed Martin’s Cyber Kill Chain framework is a potentially valuable perspective for highly risk averse and highly targeted organisations. Its language is militaristic and technical, which means that it is most suitable for people already inclined to that way of thinking, but in contrast, it may be inappropriate and ineffective with other audiences.

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  • Conclusion: as cyber-security becomes a board-level topic, organisations in the A/NZ region are feeling the pinch of the security skills shortage. In this environment, moving IT services to the Cloud has the potential to streamline and/or automate some basic IT security practices. Cloud services are not an IT security silver bullet, but for many organisations,

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  • Conclusion: As much as the industry should not blame the victims of cyberattacks, the industry must also learn from these crimes. There are important lessons that must be drawn out from these breaches, because most organisations would be equally vulnerable to similar attacks. Three key lessons are: look for indicators of compromise and be sufficiently resourced

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  • Conclusion: When considering using cyber-insurance to deal with the potential costs associated with a successful attack, there are important considerations that CIOs and CISOs should be highlighting to operational risk and finance executives. Most organisations will need to raise their risk maturity substantially, and this means investment as well as changes to

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  • Mandatory data breach disclosure is exactly what it says: legislation that obliges an organisation to reveal that it has experienced a data breach and lost control of its customers’ personally identifying and/or sensitive information. The industry buzz really started in 2003 with California Senate Bill 1386 which obliged

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  • Conclusion: Cyber-insurance will be an inevitability for all organisations. However, executives should be clear on what level of cover they are buying, what incidents they are getting cover for, and the costs and impacts on the organisation that insurance cannot (or may not) cover.

    An exploration into the feasibility of cyber-insurance is likely to raise good

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  • Conclusion: The probability of an inside attack is hard to gauge and depends entirely on the inner state of the attacker, but the impact can range from inconsequential to disproportionately vast. CIOs must assess the risk of a malicious insider in the context of their organisation’s information assets and risk management

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  • Conclusion:Accusations against Huawei of spying for the Chinese Government are destabilising confidence in this vendor in the local market. Consequently, the key challenge for Huawei in the enterprise IT space will be a growing reticence by people to be trained in a technology that is being

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In the News

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Conducted by Australia’s Intelligent Business Research Services (IBRS) and commissioned by TechnologyOne, the survey of 261 business leaders in ANZ has shown that business functions are having more...
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Managed security: a big gamble for Aussie IT providers - CRN - 02 August 2018

TechSci Research estimates the Australian managed security services (MSS) market will grow at a CAGR of more than 15 percent from 2018-23 as a result of the increased uptake of cloud computing and...
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Kids, Education and The Future of Work with Dr Joseph Sweeney - Potential Psychology - 25 July 2018

What is the future of work and how do we prepare our kids for it? Are schools and universities setting kids up for future success? Does technology in the classroom improve outcomes for kids? Should...
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